Ignorance of diabetes is 'a disaster in waiting': 70% of Brits don't know …

By
Daily Mail Reporter

20:12 EST, 22 September 2013


|

20:15 EST, 22 September 2013

Widespread ignorance: Most Britons don't know that diabetes can have seriously damaging effects on health (file picture)

Widespread ignorance: Most Britons don’t know that diabetes can have seriously damaging effects on health (file picture)

Widespread ignorance about the damaging effects of diabetes is exposed in a poll out today.

Some 70 per cent of Britons said they did not know that the most serious form of the disease can lead to amputations and blindness.

Only 16 per cent knew that heart attacks are linked to type 2 diabetes and just 7 per cent realised it could trigger strokes, according to the survey.

The lack of awareness comes despite the fact that those with the illness are 36 per cent more likely to die in any given year than those without it of the same age.

Diabetes UK commissioned the survey as part of a £2million campaign funded in partnership with Tesco to raise awareness of the risk factors.

The charity’s chief executive Barbara Young said the aim is to ‘lay to rest the myth’ that type 2 diabetes is a mild condition.

‘This is a misconception that is wrecking lives and is the reason that as a country we are sleepwalking towards a public health disaster of an almost unimaginable scale,’ she said.

Losing weight, eating more fruit and vegetables and becoming more active are thought to cut the risks of diabetes.

But only half of those who took part in the poll knew being overweight was a risk factor.

Only 13 per cent realised that having a family member with diabetes raises the danger and one in 100 mentioned being South Asian or black as a risk factor.

Without urgent action, campaigners fear cases of type 2 diabetes will rise by one million to five million by 2025.

It can also increase likelihood of high blood pressure and high cholesterol

  • Napping for more than 30 minutes at a time can raise the risk of diabetes, according to a new study
  • It can also increase likelihood of high blood pressure and high cholesterol

By
Pat Hagan

19:04 EST, 20 September 2013


|

19:14 EST, 20 September 2013

They were much favoured by Margaret Thatcher, Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill.

But while afternoon naps may revitalise tired brains, they can also increase the risk of diabetes, according to new research.

A study of more than 27,000 people in China – where taking a post-lunch snooze is very popular – shows napping for more than 30 minutes at a time can raise the chances of developing type two diabetes.

Researchers found men and women taking 40 winks were also more likely to have high blood pressure and raised cholesterol levels compared to those who stayed awake through the day.

Napping for more than 30 minutes at a time can raise the chances of developing type two diabetes, according to a new study

Napping for more than 30 minutes at a time can raise the chances of developing type two diabetes, according to a new study

The findings, published in the journal Sleep Medicine, are in contrast to those from other recent studies, which found daytime sleeps could boost brain power and slash the risk of heart attacks and strokes by more than a third.

The researchers said it’s the duration of the nap that counts. Those dozing for half an hour or more were more likely to have the early signs of diabetes than those who snoozed for less time or not at all.

In 2009, a planned UK National Siesta Day was cancelled when similar research from China found a 26 per cent increase in diabetes risk among those regularly getting their heads down in the afternoon.

Diabetes affects an estimated 2.5 million people in the UK. Around ten per cent of cases are due to type one, which is thought to be caused by a malfunctioning immune system and has nothing to do with diet.

Diabetes affects an estimated 2.5 million people in the UK. Above, a woman tests her blood sugar (file pic)

Diabetes affects an estimated 2.5 million people in the UK, with around ten per cent of cases due to a malfunctioning immune system. Above, a woman tests her blood sugar (file pic)

But the remaining 90 per cent are type two, closely linked to unhealthy diet and lifestyle.

The body loses its ability to make use of glucose, a type of sugar that is released when we eat food and turned into a source of energy for use by muscles.

As glucose levels rise, circulation starts to suffer and blood vessels in areas such as the heart, the legs and the eyes can be irreparably damaged.

In the latest study, researchers at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China studied 27,009 men and women aged 45 or over.

Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was famously known for napping

Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was famously known for napping

Almost 70 per cent of the volunteers said they regularly took a nap in the afternoon.

Researchers checked their health by carrying out a test called impaired fasting plasma glucose.

This measures whether sugar in the blood is too high and acts as an early warning sign that type two diabetes is setting in.

Researchers also looked to see which volunteers were in the early stages of the disease.

They found glucose readings were much higher among those who favoured a daytime sleep.

Forty per cent of them also had high blood pressure, compared to just 33 per cent of non-nappers, and 24 per cent had high cholesterol, versus 19 per cent.

One reason a siesta may be harmful is it simply means less exercise is being undertaken, the researchers said.

But it could also be that it disrupts the body’s internal clock and exposes organs to higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol.

In a report on their findings the researchers said: ‘Napping in the elderly can be beneficial for daytime functioning, as well as for mental health.

‘But there is accumulating evidence showing it may also be a risk factor for morbidity and mortality.’
Dr Matthew Hobbs, head of research for Diabetes UK, said there was no proof that napping actually caused diabetes.

He said: ‘The bottom line is that the best way to reduce your risk of type two diabetes is to maintain a healthy weight by eating a healthy, balanced diet and by being regularly physically active.’

The comments below have been moderated in advance.

My dad and grandfather took a nap every day. Neither one ever had health problems. This study sounds like it was staged.

Grace
,

tucson, United States,
21/9/2013 03:01

Where do you people get these study ideas? Is there anything you are not studying? If we believe all these studies we will find that everything we do is bad for us and everything we do not do is what is good for us. The egg is bad, no the egg is good, napping of all things being deadly is the last straw. How come sleeping at night doesn’t kill us too? Oh wait, we snore!

scottyusa
,

Windham, United States,
21/9/2013 03:00

What a load of cobblers if was good enough for Maggie,Albert and Winnie then it is good enough for me,i love my afternoon naps.I am retired and no i do not have diabetes,high blood pressure or high cholesterol but i do exercise a lot.

wolfy
,

warrington,
21/9/2013 02:59

Correlation does not equal causation. Likely,the people who take naps are less fit, less healthy and take naps because of these health issues.

Lisa
,

Melbourne,
21/9/2013 02:57

I think you’ll find you have ’cause’ and ‘effect ‘ the wrong way round here……

NHS Nightmare
,

Huddersfield, United Kingdom,
21/9/2013 02:49

nooooo….I like having a nap

texanscot2005
,

Htown,
21/9/2013 02:37

I guess that I am okay, as I have never taken a nap in my life. I can only sleep in a bed at night, however tired I might be.

rickyo
,

Charleston,
21/9/2013 02:35

Maybe they are already ill and need to nap because of this not the other way around.

Mrs Runner5k
,

Maryland,
21/9/2013 02:30

Or do people who have a nap are more likely to to have diabetes?

DanStlMo
,

ST Louis Missouri, United States,
21/9/2013 02:15

Does the nap cause the diseases, or do they nap because they already have early signs of the diseases?

PB
,

Atlanta,
21/9/2013 02:11

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Theresa May r MARTIN SCURR says Type 1 diabetes has dominated life of his …

  • Theresa May has been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 56
  • It will ignite attention of anyone who has an interest in this condition
  • Mrs May will have to inject herself with insulin, like my eldest son Ben

By
Martin Scurr

19:57 EST, 28 July 2013


|

02:20 EST, 29 July 2013

Sufferer: As a father I've seen first-hand how Type 1 diabetes has dominated the life of my eldest son, Ben, for the best part of 30 years

Sufferer: As a father I’ve seen first-hand how Type 1 diabetes has dominated the life of my eldest son, Ben, for the best part of 30 years

The news that Home Secretary Theresa May has been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 56 will ignite the attention of anyone who has an interest in this condition — especially as it is so rare for someone of her age.

I have several patients with Type 1 diabetes, but as a father I’ve seen first-hand how it has dominated the life of my eldest son, Ben, for the best part of 30 years.

In my 36 years as a GP, I can’t recall a fiftysomething patient who has developed it out of the blue. Doctors occasionally see the onset of Type 1 in teenagers or young adults in their 20s, but later than that is very unusual.

I would imagine someone as organised as the Home Secretary will be able to manage her condition and go on living a relatively normal life. But as I have seen with Ben, even if you are meticulous in your management of Type 1 diabetes, you can only minimise — never completely absolve yourself — of complications.

Mrs May, who had been strongly tipped to succeed David Cameron as Conservative leader, admits she often works an 18-hour day. And although long ministerial hours will still be achievable, she will have to ensure that she eats regular sit-down meals.

There can be no erratic snacking on chocolate or crisps for the diabetic.

Like Ben, Mrs May will have to inject herself with insulin. Some people use pumps which infuse a continuous flow of insulin rather than several large shots, but these are not as common as the injections — simply because they are formidably expensive and fairly new.

But no matter how careful you are, mistakes will be made, and we see this with Ben all the time. If he has too little insulin, or too much food and not enough exercise, he can’t go long before his blood sugar can go stormingly high.

The penalty for that is serious complications such as eye and kidney damage and a greatly increased rate of atheroma formation, the process of clogging up of arteries in the heart or brain with cholesterol deposits.

Too much insulin and he may pass out through too low a level of glucose in the blood, a so-called ‘hypo’ (hypoglycaemic attack).

Ben developed diabetes when he was seven, and as a child he would become very aggressive, spitting at us and lashing out before passing out unconscious if we couldn’t get a sugary drink or snack down him in time.

Although Ben manages his diabetes with great care and has led a full life — gaining a history degree from Manchester University and carving out a successful career in TV commercials — he has by no means been immune to complications. The Home Secretary should take heed.

Diabetes is the most common cause of acquired blindness in the western world, and six months ago Ben lost his driving licence because he has a retinopathy — where the retina at the back of the eye becomes damaged.

He has passed out on countless occasions, sometimes on his own on a train or in an airport where, distressingly, onlookers have mistaken him for a drunk. For that reason he wears a medical bracelet to alert people to his condition.

Coping: Like Ben, Home Secretary Theresa May (pictured last month) will have to inject herself with insulin

Coping: Like Ben, Home Secretary Theresa May (pictured last month) will have to inject herself with insulin

This will be something that Mrs May must be worried about. There’s every chance that she might keel over at the despatch box or in a meeting. For this reason, everyone around her — from her personal secretary to her driver — must be up to speed on her condition.

She will want to be independent, yet everyone must be aware of the signs and symptoms of her condition because every now and then a meal will get missed or she will take in too much insulin and she will go off beam.

A diabetic always wants to be independent but, as parents, we had to brief everyone from friends to teachers to skiing instructors about Ben’s condition in case he passed out.

Unfortunately, Ben has also suffered from kidney failure and had a transplant. Now, that kidney has also failed and he is due to go back on to dialysis.

One day in the next year or so, he hopes to have another transplant, this time of a kidney and pancreas, which should cure him of diabetes.

It’s very new technology and I know of no patients who have gone through this operation, but it’s part of the new world of transplanting that offers hope to diabetics everywhere. The tragedy is that he will have to wait for someone else to die before he can be cured.

Type 1 is most commonly called acute juvenile onset diabetes because it is a dramatic disease that suddenly appears and almost universally affects young people. Only last week, a child of only one was diagnosed at my practice.

This is in contrast to Type 2 diabetes, also known as maturity onset diabetes, which, although it is also recognised by the presence of high glucose levels in the bloodstream, is almost a different disease entirely.

We see Type 2 in middle-aged and older people, usually in the context of excess body weight, the problem being a relative rather than an absolute deficiency of the hormone insulin.

But Type 1 diabetes is a medical emergency and an incurable illness that occurs because of the sudden loss of insulin, a  protein hormone that is  produced by nests of cells that are situated in the pancreas.

Type 1 diabetes is a medical emergency
and an incurable illness that occurs because of the sudden loss of
insulin, a  protein hormone that is  produced by nests of cells that are
situated in the pancreas

Insulin is vital for the control of blood glucose levels. Glucose is the most important currency — the pound sterling — of energy in the body. It is the preferred fuel for our heart muscle, it is the only energy source that our brains can use, and insulin is the hormone that controls glucose levels, mobilising it from stores and enabling body tissues to use the glucose at the site needed.

With Type 1 diabetes, quite suddenly, insulin production ceases — usually because the cells making it are rapidly killed off by antibodies or a virus.

Glucose levels then soar and the patient becomes acutely ill within days, with weight loss, thirst, weakness and eventually a state called diabetic ketoacidosis — a derangement of the chemistry of the entire body, with over-breathing, vomiting and eventual loss of consciousness.

Before the Twenties, when insulin was discovered and could be purified (from beef or pig pancreatic tissue) and then injected as a treatment, death was the outcome.

Thankfully, treatment has come a long way since those dark days.

Ben was diagnosed six weeks after he had suffered a bout of chicken pox. Doctors believe that a virus may trigger Type 1 diabetes in someone who has a genetic susceptibility.

We had noticed he had started climbing up to the sink to drink water from the tap as he was suffering from extreme thirst. He was also getting up regularly in the night to urinate.

Colleagues: Home Secretary Theresa May is pictured with Prime Minister David Cameron earlier this month. Mrs May will want to be independent, yet everyone must be aware of the signs and symptoms of her condition

Colleagues: Home Secretary Theresa May is pictured with Prime Minister David Cameron earlier this month. Mrs May will want to be independent, yet everyone must be aware of the signs and symptoms of her condition

These are common symptoms of diabetes but to my shame, I didn’t spot what was happening straight away. At the time, my wife was 38 weeks pregnant with our second son, Cosmo, and I simply thought Ben was being wilful because the new baby was nearly here.

In the end, I took a urine sample which showed his sugar levels were high. So I took a blood sample and to my horror, his blood sugar reading was six times higher than it should have been.

I rang Guy’s Hospital to inform them of my boy’s symptoms and to my astonishment, they asked me to bring him in a couple of days. When I told them he would be dead by then, they admitted him straight away.

There, he was diagnosed with Type 1, and
my wife was admitted with him because she had to learn quickly how to
manage our son’s incurable illness.

Ben checks his blood glucose around four to five times a day – and it’s likely that the Home Secretary will have to do the same

His treatment involves striking a careful balance between food intake and the dose of insulin needed. Diabetics must be particularly watchful over the amount of carbohydrate and starch they consume, as glucose forms the main building bricks of much larger starch molecules.

Insulin is usually injected between two and four times daily, depending on the needs of the individual.

Ben checks his blood glucose around four to five times a day — and it’s likely that the Home Secretary will have to do  the same.

He has to prick his finger and insert a dot of blood into a portable gizmo. It means he can govern carefully what he needs to eat and also calculate the correct insulin dosage to inject into himself at that moment in time.

The Home Secretary will have to get used to this routine and fit it into her already busy schedule. How much energy she has been using a day will need to be taken into consideration. Sitting in Cabinet meetings or an office uses less fuel than dashing about to constituency meetings, going to the gym, or hill walking  on holiday.

The essence of treating a patient with diabetes is to educate them to enable them to self govern and take full responsibility for managing their own condition with rigorous self discipline and meticulous  attention to all details.

Only in this way are future complications minimised and a normal life possible — even for a future possible Prime Minister.

The comments below have not been moderated.

Perhaps Mrs May’s GP would consider offering her a DAFNE course? Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating – I have found it an extremely helpful guide in managing my “late onset” Type 1 [diagnosed as Type 2 initially just like Mrs May’s]. Diagnosed at 46, now 64, I am well, happy and still working [although part time and now in NZ] – I do think diabetes was there in the background for many years and perhaps only became a real problem following several years of overworking and long hours. Otherwise life is normal and insulin regime is a fact of life and best accepted as so.

ExPatLyn
,

Napier, New Zealand,
29/7/2013 23:10

My son was dignosed on 23/2/13 after go missed on the 21 st even though we expressed concerns he refused to test sugars but that’s another story and one that’s being investigated by the GMC as on the 23 rd he was admitted in diabetic KETO acidosis nt a nice condition and very frightening for patient and family members…..GPS need to listen to patients and parents and not stop when they make there mind up…..luckily for us we took him to hospital when we did as he would have been in a coma two hours later…..the blood test showed six times ove the limit for a child that’s a lot….his consultant says the condition was miked as my son does lots of activity so the onset was hidden until days before when his sugars were sky high…..as a paren I blame myself too but. Can’t change it he has diabetes and it could not have stopped it b getting there sooner….m son would not have been so poorly though and for a two pound blood sugar test my son could have been saved lots of pain…..

Sammy D
,

Staffordshire, United Kingdom,
29/7/2013 17:26

I have only three words for all the diabetics (type 1 or 2) out there. GOOGLE DR BERNSTEIN

kelebek
,

Turkey,
29/7/2013 16:48

WOW. you failed your child!! You are a DOCTOR and your son’s diabetes was so badly mismanaged that he has retinopathy and kidney failure? I’m 29, Type 1 since I was 10, and live in permanent fear that I will go blind etc, and had a normal teenage rebellion for a while but do not have any damage as yet. My parents didn’t pressure me, I had normal food. So how the HELL has your son become so damaged without serious failings on your behalf?! I don’t think you’re in any position to write such a stupid article. Glad you’re not my doctor, let alone my DAD!

emelsie
,

exeter,
29/7/2013 15:38

54 years and counting with Type 1, this Dr his son need to realise it is not the end of the world and get on with having a life! It hasn’t stopped me from doing anything, there are thousands, like me, that just get on with it rather than bleating about it!

Maggie
,

UK,
29/7/2013 14:46

My husband was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes at the age of 41, nearly 7 years ago and two years after our daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 at the age of 6. His GP thought it couldn’t be T1 and said T2 but consultant said he was Type 1. Its a misconception that they cannot develop it older. The consultant told my husband that the oldest person he had diagnosed recently with T1 was 73!!! Unfortunately we have Type 1 on both sides as my sister has been T1 for 30 years, our daughter now for 9 years, my husband for 7 years and his nephew for 5 years. He also has a cousin with T1. It takes a lot of hard work and effort to keep both of them healthy and unfortunately my daughter also has other health issues which makes it harder but she was lucky to be given an insulin pump two years ago which has made a huge difference to her overall control. Type 1 diabetes is a game of balance every day for the rest of your life and affects all the family involved.

Cat26
,

Glasgow,
29/7/2013 14:42

It always baffles me why diabetes type 1 sufferers would even consider eating anything with sugar in or even anything such as a sugar free juice? Water is sugar free, drink that! Red arrow me as I obviously don’t understand!
– LaughingGravy, Wirral, 29/7/2013 6:51.— Why shouldn’t people with diabetes have as much choice as the rest of us? Variety is the spice of life and children especially want to have something more exciting than water. Not just that but it helps people feel more normal? Also, as far as I’m aware, diabetics need sugar in their diet they just need to be careful about how much.

Charli
,

Cardiff,
29/7/2013 14:33

Like any disease, some have a harder time than others. I sympathize with those who have lost limbs or organs and congratulate those who have not. The difference is certainly not always because one person is more diligent than another. To think so is cruel and ignorant.

SantaFeJack
,

Newport News VA USA,
29/7/2013 14:33

My sister has diabetes and copes fine!

Richard M
,

Stockholm-Expat,
29/7/2013 13:47

Most people think of diabetes Type 1 2 as one condition but they’re no’s no comparison. When my 5yr old son was diagnosed with Type 1 some years ago (no family history) – I was told diabetes is nothing these days!!! However it completely changed our family life – I had needle phobia too but had to overcome it – blood samples were worse for me. Meals, snacks, exercise, illness hypo’s had to be managed as well as looking after the other 3 children one only a few days old. The belief is that many more people carry the gene for Type 1 diabetes than have it but it needs a trigger – in our case a virus, Type 2 diabetes is relatively common in the older age group but can be managed with diet, diet and tablets and in some cases with insulin – but not to be confused with Type 1 diabetes. It’s onset is usually gradual and it’s possible with proper diet and exercise to avoid type 2 diabetes. Mrs May will have to cope with the changes to her life and it’s easier if others know

JF
,

Birmingham, United Kingdom,
29/7/2013 13:24

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Why mothers struggling to breastfeed could be showing early signs of diabetes

  • New research suggests insulin does more than facilitate uptake of sugars
  • American scientists think believe up to 20% of
    new mothers could be at risk of low milk supply due to the body not using insulin as it should 
  • A clinical trial is planned with a
    drug used to control type two diabetes to determine whether it improves milk supply

By
Sarah Griffiths

17:21 EST, 5 July 2013


|

17:21 EST, 5 July 2013

Mothers having trouble breastfeeding may be showing the early signs of diabetes, doctors have warned.

New research has revealed the hormone insulin plays an important part in the production of breast milk – and mothers who are struggling with feeding may have low levels of insulin.

For a long time, insulin was not thought to play a direct role in regulating the milk-making cells of the human breast.

But scientists now know that the mammary gland in breast becomes sensitive to insulin during lactation.

New research has revealed that insulin plays an important part in the production of milk

New research has revealed that insulin plays an important part in the production of milk. For a long time, insulin was not thought to play a direct role in regulating the milk-making cells of the human breast. But scientists now know that the mammary gland becomes sensitive to insulin during lactation

A clinical trial is now planned with a drug used to control type 2 diabetes to determine whether it improves milk supply – and the researchers suggest that women struggling to breastfeed should perhaps get their insulin levels checked.

Insulin levels are linked to diabetes. In people with type 1 diabetes, beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed, meaning that the body can no longer produce insulin.

People with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but their bodies don’t respond well to it. Some people with type 2 diabetes may take pills or insulin shots to help their bodies use glucose for energy.

Previous research from Dr
Laurie Nommsen-Rivers, the study author, have shown it takes longer for milk to come in to
women whose bodies struggle to metabolise enough insulin.

Dr Laurie Nommsen-Rivers explored the connection between milk production and insulin levels

Dr Laurie Nommsen-Rivers explored the connection between milk production and insulin levels, (an insulin pen is pictured)

Those who tend to struggle often have factors involved such as being
overweight, being at an advanced maternal age, or having a large
birth-weight baby. 

Dr Nommsen-Rivers and her colleagues
were able to use a non-invasive method to capture mammary gland RNA – a
chain of molecules that are blueprints for making specified proteins –
in samples of human breast milk.

They
then created the first publicly accessible library of genes expressed
in the mammary gland based on RNA-sequencing technology.

They discovered an orchestrated
switching on and off of various genes as the mammary gland transitions
from secreting small amounts of immunity-boosting colostrum in the first
days after giving birth to the copious production of milk in mature
lactation.

Having
identified the significance of insulin signalling in the production of
breast-milk, the scientists at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical
Centre and the University of California Davis, are now planning a
clinical trial with a drug used to control type two diabetes to
determine whether it improves insulin action in the mammary gland, thus
improving milk supply.

Dr Nommsen-Rivers said: ‘Considering
that 20 per cent of women between 20 and 44 are pre-diabetic, it’s
conceivable that up to 20 per cent of new mothers in the United States
are at risk for low milk supply due to insulin dysregulation [i.e. low
levels],’ she said.

While a drug is not an ideal way to solve the problem according to Dr Nommsen-Rivers, it is a way to establish proof-of-concept.

‘The ideal approach is a preventive one,’ she said.

‘Modifications in diet and exercise are more powerful than any drug. After this clinical trial, we hope to study those interventions.’

A clinical trial is planned with a drug used to control type two diabetes to determine whether it improves milk supply

A clinical trial is planned with a drug used to control type two diabetes to determine whether it improves milk supply

End of the diabetes jab? Scientists find insulin-boosting hormone that could …

  • A newly discovered hormone – betatrophin – could revolutionise the treatment of type 2 diabetes
  • It could halt the development of the condition
  • In mice the hormone was shown to increase the number of insulin-producing beta cells up to 30-fold

By
Fiona Macrae Science Correspondent

11:00 EST, 25 April 2013


|

18:47 EST, 25 April 2013

Diabetics could be freed from the need to inject themselves by the development of a once-a-year drug

Diabetics could be freed from the need to inject themselves by the development of a once-a-year drug

Millions of diabetics could be freed from having to inject themselves several times a day by a once-a-year drug.

Scientists have discovered a hormone which can boost the number of insulin-making cells  by up to 30-fold.

This would ‘dramatically’ improve treatment for type 2 diabetes. This form of the condition, often triggered by weight gain, is becoming more common in the obesity crisis.

Researchers from Harvard University believe the betatrophin hormone may even have the power to halt type 2 diabetes in its tracks.

‘It could eventually mean that, instead of taking insulin injections three times a day, you might be able to take this hormone once a week or once a month, or in the best case, maybe once a year,’ they said.

In patients with type 2, or adult-onset diabetes, cells in the pancreas do not make enough insulin, a hormone vital to the conversion of sugar into energy. Insulin they do make does not work properly.

Initially, the condition is often controlled with a stringent diet and exercise regime. But many patients will suffer worsening health over time, eventually needing tablets or insulin injections.

Seeking an alternative to simply giving insulin, the US researchers looked for a way of boosting its production in the body.

This led them to a hormone which they christened betatrophin.

Given to mice, it raised the number of insulin-producing beta cells by up to 30-fold, reported the journal Cell.

In addition, the ‘enormous’ number of new cells only made insulin when needed, which should lead to more natural blood sugar levels and better health.

Given to mice, the new hormone raised numbers of insulin-producing beta cells up to 30-fold

Given to mice, the new hormone raised numbers of insulin-producing beta cells up to 30-fold

Researcher Professor Doug Melton said the discovery had left him so excited that he could hardly sleep. He added: ‘Our idea is  relatively simple.

‘We would provide this hormone, the type 2 diabetic will make more of their insulin-producing cells and this will slow down, if not stop, the progression of their diabetes.’ Drug firms have already seized on the breakthrough and the hormone could be tested on people in just three years.

However, the need to show it would be safe and effective in large numbers of people means it is a decade away from the market.

Yesterday’s Daily Mail reported how just one 12oz can of sugary drink a day can raise the risk of type 2 diabetes by a fifth.

Complications of high blood sugar include heart disease, blindness, and nerve and circulatory damage.

It is thought that one in 20 Britons has diabetes, with type 2 making up 90 per cent of the cases.

The US work may also be useful in treating type 1 diabetes, which typically develops in childhood or adolescence.

The comments below have not been moderated.

this was talked about before but wont happen too much money involved for Eli Lilly

mark adam
,

london, United Kingdom,
26/4/2013 02:18

Why are people positively rating Joan from Sandbach’s contribution that “people with Type 2 diabetes have a choice. They can help themselves with diet and exercise”. I have type 2 diabetes and produce so little insulin that I have to inject myself with insulin at least 5 times a day. I bet my diet and exercise is a good deal better than Joan from Sandbach’s but in any case Sir Steve Redgrave has type 2 diabetes. I’d love to know what the vile and pig ignorant people who think anyone deserves this serious illness have to say about that.

Steelman
,

Sheffield,
26/4/2013 01:09

I’m Type 1 and have being doing injections for 31 years today, to be honest I’ve had enough, but I can’t give up or bye bye me, I wish they sort something out for us just for once we have no other option!! My body has been injected over 45,000 times and no end in site, I lost all muscle in both arms at the age of 6 (1984) thanks to doctor saying its ok to it there, it came back thankfully Type 2’s thank yourselves luck if you control it well as mentioned by others you take pills, wish I was so lucky!

Sllaw79
,

Cheshire,
26/4/2013 00:54

Because of such poor treatment from my G.P’s. I subscribed to Diabetes UK. Boy what a con that is – all they seemed to want to do is ask for money via donations. Beware they only seem to be after your money.

Mrs B
,

Southern England, United Kingdom,
26/4/2013 00:51

For all the people who have their facts wrong… I am type 2 diabetic. Type 2 diabetics can end up being treated with insulin. I use metformin and liraglutide. The liraglutide is injected into my stomache at night. Polycystic overies and genetics play a big part in developing type 2 diabetes. I have PCOS (polycystic overies syndrome), i was diagnosed at 16 and with PCOS and at 27 with diabetes,which at least three women on my mothers side have type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is also as dangerous as type 1.

Mog29
,

Rochdale, United Kingdom,
25/4/2013 22:46

Comment by Ranger from Blackpool £50 a box, being diabetic your prescriptions are free. In Scotland all prescriptions are free but before this came in me being diabetic got free prescriptions.

DJW
,

North Ayrshire,
25/4/2013 22:20

my diabetes is type one. metformin and injections into the stomach twice daily. if you inject anywhere else, bad bruising can form.

john back
,

london,
25/4/2013 22:12

Since when do type 2 diabetics have to inject daily? Get your facts right DM – Roger Phillips, Swansea, 25/4/2013 20:45-

To Roger and all the other non diabetics on these pages, I am Type 2 diabetic and I take both Metformin and a dose of Insulin from a disposable pen twice a day, every day, and I also have to test my blood glucose level as the gentleman was doing in the photo. If this news is correct, then I can hardly wait, as my stomach is getting like a pin cushion. I cannot inject into a leg or thigh like some, as it would go straight into a muscle, and that is bad for you, so I welcome this news.

Oldcogger
,

Birmingham, United Kingdom,
25/4/2013 22:07

Since when do type 2 diabetics have to inject daily? Get your facts right DM

– Roger Phillips, Swansea, 25/4/2013 20:45

My husband has Type 2 diabetes and injects twice a day, Roger! You get YOUR facts right please!

Ann
,

France,
25/4/2013 21:37

– UKIP Supporter, Bromley, 25/4/2013 19:17……..Interesting that you comment on genetic engineering. I am type 1 diabetic, third generation. My father’s insulin was harvested from animals. A workable compromise, but far from ideal. I am more fortunate. I can inject insulins of the exact human formulae – both fast acting and slow acting. This is because insulin is now produced by genetically modified bacteria. I am afraid I tend to laugh at those who are horrified because I am injecting myself with what they describe as a GM product.

Mike A
,

Channel Islands, Guernsey,
25/4/2013 21:35

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Teeth loss linked to heart attacks, diabetes and high cholesterol 'because it …

  • Study links gum disease with heart disease and diabetes
  • Regular dental treatment can cut the risk of heart disease
  • Risk markers also include ‘bad’ cholesterol, blood
    sugar, blood pressure and waist circumference.

By
Jaymi Mccann

20:59 EST, 22 March 2013


|

21:01 EST, 22 March 2013

Losing your teeth could signal a higher risk of suffering heart disease and diabetes, warn researchers.

A new study links fewer teeth and bleeding gums with a range of cardiovascular problems, including high blood pressure and high cholesterol.

Experts say getting gum disease treated with a dental check-up every year could cut the risk of developing heart disease.

Dentists say that gum disease has links with those who have high cholesterol as it causes inflammation in the bloodstream

Dentists say that gum disease has links with those who have high cholesterol as it causes inflammation in the bloodstream

Previously, researchers found poor dental hygiene and bleeding gums could allow up to 700 different types of bacteria to get into the bloodstream, which increases the risk of a heart attack regardless of how fit and healthy the person is.

Gum disease causes bad breath, bleeding gums and, if untreated, cavities, receding gums and tooth loss after bacteria or plaque settles between teeth and under the gumline.

It has been linked to chronic health problems including heart disease, thought to be caused by inflammation into the bloodstream.

In the first study of its type, Swedish researchers looked at patients with chronic coronary heart disease taking part in a drugs trial and examined their dental health.

At the start of the study, 15,828 study participants from 39 countries reported their remaining number of teeth, classified as: none, 1-14, 15-19, 20-25 or 26-32, and frequency of gum bleeds: never/rarely, sometimes, often or always.

Around 40 per cent of patients had fewer than 15 teeth and 16 per cent had no teeth, while one in four reported gum bleeds.

Cardiac risk markers also went up as the number of teeth dropped, including 'bad' cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure and waist circumference

Cardiac risk markers also went up as the number of teeth dropped, including ‘bad’ cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure and waist circumference

For every fall in the number of teeth recorded, the study found increasing levels of an enzyme that increases inflammation and promotes hardening of the arteries.

Other cardiac risk markers also went up as the number of teeth dropped, including ‘bad’ cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure and waist circumference.

Patients with fewer teeth also had more chance of having diabetes, with the odds increasing by 11 per cent for every fall in the number of teeth category.

Bleeding gums were associated with higher levels of bad cholesterol and blood pressure.
The study was carried out at Uppsala University, Sweden.

Professor Robin Seymour , a member of the Simplyhealth Advisory Research Panel (ShARP) which is backed by the healthcare provider, said although several studies have proposed a link between dental and heart health, there was little data on gum disease in patients with diagnosed heart disease.

He said it was unclear how gum, or periodontal, disease affected heart health.

One possibility is that oral bacteria entering the bloodstream may activate the immune system, making artery walls inflamed and narrowed, or attach directly to fatty deposits already present in the arteries which causes further narrowing.

Prof Seymour said generalised body inflammation might cause both conditions, or gum disease might be the trigger for cardiovascular disease.

He said ‘What is clear is that people can reduce their risk of periodontal disease by regularly visiting the dentist.

‘Check-ups and treatment for periodontal disease may also reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. As a result, it is vital for people to go through basic periodontal screening at least once a year so that a thorough inspection of periodontal tissues can be achieved.’ An Australian study last year found women with gum disease took an extra two months to get pregnant compared with women with healthy teeth and gums.

It took around seven months on average for women with poor oral hygiene to conceive, but just five months for those who brushed their teeth properly.

Other researchers found a link between high levels of dental plaque, or bacteria, and cancer death up to 13 years earlier than expected.

The comments below have not been moderated.

So your headline statement of a “causal link” becomes a mere “association” by the end of the story.

Gramsci Refusenik
,

Idiocracy, United Kingdom,
23/3/2013 19:23

After my first pregnancy i ended up with about 4 cavities from perfectly healthy teeth/diet and taking care of them..eating prenatal vitamins like candy…by my third child i had over half my mouth full of cavities…during the past few years i have been called a druggie and meth mouth…never done meth in my life. Glad i got all but 6 pulled though, no pain and no poison.- tassy, Norman, United States ———————————————- Hormones in pregnancy can cause dental problems, it was the reason all pregnant women used to qualify for free dental care under the NHS, I’m not sure if they still do.

Grasshopper Farmer
,

Sandburrville,
23/3/2013 17:22

What is really sad is the governments Medicaid and Medicare pay for people under the age of 18 to have everything from teeth removed to full dental checkups to dentures….while those 18 and over are only allowed emergency tooth removal….cause yea i see a lot of people 18 and under needing dentures…its like they don’t realize if they don’t help those with bad teeth over the age of 18 it will catch up with them and cause more medical problems in the long run that they in turn will have to pay for.

And don’t always judge a book by its cover….i was born with a calcium and enzyme deficiency and didn’t know it. After my first pregnancy i ended up with about 4 cavities from perfectly healthy teeth/diet and taking care of them..eating prenatal vitamins like candy…by my third child i had over half my mouth full of cavities…during the past few years i have been called a druggie and meth mouth…never done meth in my life. Glad i got all but 6 pulled though, no pain and no poison.

tassy
,

Norman, United States,
23/3/2013 17:13

Most stories in the media are depressing. I am starting to wish the world would end so I will be put out of my misery.

male
,

uk,
23/3/2013 15:29

New study? I think you’ll find people have know about this for many years!

Auger Borer
,

East Midlands, United Kingdom,
23/3/2013 15:27

Better tell Jezza Kyle then he has plenty people on his show like this !!!!

jog the one and only
,

somerset,
23/3/2013 15:16

FACT – none of us will get out of this life alive and there are no rewards for dying with all your teeth and a trim waist!

Katrina
,

Nottingham, United Kingdom,
23/3/2013 15:02

Old news!

anon
,

uk,
23/3/2013 15:01

How odd, the last study I read from the American Association of Cardiologists ruled out any links between gum and heart disease. There’s also the possibility that exposing the body to bacteria helps develop a resistance, but to be on the safe side simply have all your teeth removed and wear dentures.

Grasshopper Farmer
,

Sandburrville,
23/3/2013 14:25

Nothing new in this. It has been known for years.

Ruth
,

Guildford, United Kingdom,
23/3/2013 14:20

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Failures are leading to premature deaths according to Parliamentary group

  • Failures are leading to premature deaths according to Parliamentary group
  • Almost half of sufferers not getting nine recommended annual checks

By
Jenny Hope

20:31 EST, 19 March 2013


|

06:21 EST, 20 March 2013

Thousands of people with diabetes are being failed by ‘shocking variations’ in NHS treatment, warn MPs.

The overall picture is of ‘poor, fragmented, expensive and patchy care’ despite £1million an hour being spent on diabetes by the NHS.

A new report by the All Party Parliamentary group for Diabetes (APPG) says failures are leading to devastating complications such as blindness, amputation and stroke, and premature deaths.

Failures: A new report by the All Party Parliamentary group for Diabetes (APPG) says NHS failures are leading to devastating complications such as blindness, amputation and stroke, and premature deaths

Failures: A new report by the All Party Parliamentary group for Diabetes (APPG) says NHS failures are leading to devastating complications such as blindness, amputation and stroke, and premature deaths

It found almost half of people with diabetes in England are not getting the nine annual checks recommended by the NHS, with some areas providing barely one in 20 patients with the whole range of checks.

The figures are worse for children, said the report, as 96 per cent don’t receive all the annual routine checks they should.

APPG chairman and Torbay MP Adrian Sanders said ‘Diabetes is one of the greatest challenges we face, yet diabetes healthcare is poor, patchy and expensive and too many people with the condition are not getting the care or support they desperately need.

‘It is completely unacceptable that barely half of people with diabetes are getting the nine checks and services recommended.

‘This postcode lottery of care is leading to devastating health conditions and premature death for many people with the condition.

‘I was moved by the powerful testimony of a person with diabetes who had lost part of his foot as a complication of diabetes’ he added.

The number of Britons diagnosed with diabetes has hit three million for the first time this year, according to figures released earlier this month.

Challenge: APPG chairman and Torbay MP Adrian Sanders says that diabetes is 'one of the greatest challenges we face'

Challenge: APPG chairman and Torbay MP Adrian Sanders says that diabetes is ‘one of the greatest challenges we face’

Nine out of ten people with diabetes have type 2 which occurs when the body gradually loses the ability to process blood sugar, leading to high levels which can damage body organs and years of ill-health. The remainder have type 1 which needs insulin treatment.

Type 2 is strongly linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle and eating an unhealthy diet.

Every year in England and Wales, 24,000 people with diabetes die earlier than expected.

The latest report, which took testimony from patients, NHS staff and experts, says diabetes costs the NHS over £10billion a year – around £1million an hour.

But eighty per cent goes on managing complications, many of which could be prevented, it says.

Mr Sanders, who has type 1 diabetes, said the group heard repeatedly from people who were not receiving nine basic annual checks including blood pressure and blood glucose.

‘Others did not know what checks they had or had not had, or had no record of the results of those checks’ he said.

The number of people receiving all nine checks ranged from six per cent to around 69 per cent depending on the area they lived.

The report found ‘shocking’ variations in levels of amputations – with the majority preventable through good care.

One on four people in nursing homes has diabetes, but many are undiagnosed, said the report.

It follows the Public Accounts Committee diabetes report that highlighted the “depressingly poor” state of diabetes healthcare.

Barbara Young, chief executive of Diabetes UK, said ‘Time and time again we hear about the depressingly poor state of diabetes healthcare, yet we are still waiting to hear how the Government intends to deal with what is fast becoming a crisis.

‘The Government must designate diabetes as a priority and commit to ensuring everyone with diabetes gets good quality care so that they can live long healthy lives.

‘This is why we welcome the All Party Parliament Group for Diabetes’ call for a national implementation plan for improved diabetes care.’

Karen Addington, chief executive of Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, said ‘The Diabetes APPG’s specific demand for increased government funding into type 1 diabetes medical research, echoes our own call.

‘Type 1 diabetes is a serious and challenging condition that affects 400,000 UK children and adults – and cost the country £1.9 billion in 2011.

‘This research and its outcomes would not only improve the lives of those living with type 1 diabetes, but would also help protect the NHS from spiralling costs.’

The comments below have not been moderated.

That’s because the majority of Diabetics are type 2! Who if actually looked after their diet would not have any troubles! I think they should be made to pay for testing strips, they got themselves in that state in the first place! Unlike my 5 yr old, who is type 1 and has no choice in treatment! So I do not sympathise at all!

Walrus Lizard King Fangirl
,

London, UK,
20/3/2013 19:38

A type 2 diabetic has to pay for testing strips, but a drug addict can get access to free needles and their methadone

mum
,

Glasgow, United Kingdom,
20/3/2013 16:54

My husband was given Metformin after he stopped taking statins due to his muscles breaking down and he now has Fybromyalgia and suffers hair loss Metformin also has side effects and last month he was admiited to hospital twice with suspected stroke I read the side effects to metformin and my husbands symtoms were as reported on the leaflet, confusion, loss of memory etc It took time to convince our doctor Since he has been taken off metformin he is much better I understan from my relations in Australia if you have your D and A tested it will show if metformin are suitable for you If this works it would save the NHS a lot of money

hightown
,

Oxfordshire,
20/3/2013 16:43

Diabetes is not a one size fits all condition. Each case will be different depending on age, BMI, diet, family history, cultural practices, medication, other medical conditions and lifestyle etc. There is a distinct difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 is an auto-immune condition which affects around 7% of all people with diabetes, usually in the under 40 age group. It happens when the insulin producing Beta cells are attacked by the immune system and the person then needs daily injections of insulin to stay alive. Historically type 2 happens in the 40+ age group and can be caused by lifestyle, obesity and a genetic predisposition. Type 2 can be controlled by diet, tablets or insulin. There is a wealth of support available. Diabetes healthcare teams in most areas provide courses like DESMOND or DAFNE and charities like DRWF provide free resources and educational days to help people manage their diabetes and prevent or delay the long term complications.

Hal
,

Portsmouth, United Kingdom,
20/3/2013 14:35

One study showed that for type 2 Diabetes 8 weeks of severe calorie restriction greatly improved the Diabetes and the improvement persisted for 7 out of 11 patients.
Obviously this would need to be done under medical supervision as it was in the study but if it really really works surely it would be worth the time and effort.

Alan
,

Sevenoaks,
20/3/2013 14:33

I am amazed at the variable comments on here. I was diagnosed ‘Type 2’ 12 years ago at the GP practise. Suffolk have a Diabetic care scheme which involved attending a Diabetic awareness course run by diabetic specialists and diaticians at West Suffolk hospital. I was put on insulin when Metformin alone was not doing the trick. All my prescription needs ie testing strips etc are on my scripts. I have eye retinopathy tests every year also arranged by the scheme. There is also a twice yearly general follow up check, so maybe I am fortunate in the Suffolk care arrangements, the rest is up to me

manyatrueword
,

silly suffolk,
20/3/2013 14:11

There is no excuse for this, there are national guidelines in place for treating and monitoring diabetics, any institution that does not follow this, then the head of that organisation should be sacked.

solomon 1066
,

bedford,
20/3/2013 13:50

I am type 2. I followed the official NHS advice on diet ie lots of carbs, low fat etc. I put on a lot of weight and my blood glucose was according to my GP, “out of control”. I did lots of research, took myself in hand and followed a low carb diet, including lots of cheese (my favourite food). My weight dropped, 4 st over a year and my BG was within normal range. My GP said, “I don’t know what you’re doing, but keep on doing it” Best advice I can give to other diabetics – find what works for you and stick with it.

Murphycat
,

Exeter,
20/3/2013 13:24

Simpy stop eating grains and sugar, and watch your diabetes disappear! Elegantly simple, so why doesn’t your doctor give you that advice? MONEY! The Medical Mafia gets poor when you get well. They DO NOT want to heal you, they want to manage your illness forever. Run away from conventional medicine, it will kill you, period!

Conk
,

Huntsville,
20/3/2013 13:16

Those checkups do absolutely nothing to help any diabetics control their carbohydrate intake or sugar levels unless the patient is able to monitor their own glucose levels at home before and after they eat! Diabetics are told to cut out sugar, sweats and cakes and watch fats but don’t know the difference between a good lower carb diet and the poor one they are advised continually to eat. It’s a fact that knowledgeable diabetics have had to learn by trial and error and most Doctors and Dietitians are only allowed to tell you what they are told to tell patients even when they know different!. Type twos and the overweight have slower metabolism due to too many carbs poly fats so advising them to eat wholemeal, grain and more low GI carbs is wrong ineffective for lowering blood glucose levels, having more brain energy, losing weight and avoiding serious health problems. Sugar, Grain, flour and some dairy items and seed fat oils are the real enemies of the liver and immune system.

sunseeker12
,

Somerset,
20/3/2013 13:14

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Failures are leading to premature deaths according to Parliamentary group

  • Failures are leading to premature deaths according to Parliamentary group
  • Almost half of sufferers not getting nine recommended annual checks

By
Jenny Hope

20:31 EST, 19 March 2013


|

06:21 EST, 20 March 2013

Thousands of people with diabetes are being failed by ‘shocking variations’ in NHS treatment, warn MPs.

The overall picture is of ‘poor, fragmented, expensive and patchy care’ despite £1million an hour being spent on diabetes by the NHS.

A new report by the All Party Parliamentary group for Diabetes (APPG) says failures are leading to devastating complications such as blindness, amputation and stroke, and premature deaths.

Failures: A new report by the All Party Parliamentary group for Diabetes (APPG) says NHS failures are leading to devastating complications such as blindness, amputation and stroke, and premature deaths

Failures: A new report by the All Party Parliamentary group for Diabetes (APPG) says NHS failures are leading to devastating complications such as blindness, amputation and stroke, and premature deaths

It found almost half of people with diabetes in England are not getting the nine annual checks recommended by the NHS, with some areas providing barely one in 20 patients with the whole range of checks.

The figures are worse for children, said the report, as 96 per cent don’t receive all the annual routine checks they should.

APPG chairman and Torbay MP Adrian Sanders said ‘Diabetes is one of the greatest challenges we face, yet diabetes healthcare is poor, patchy and expensive and too many people with the condition are not getting the care or support they desperately need.

‘It is completely unacceptable that barely half of people with diabetes are getting the nine checks and services recommended.

‘This postcode lottery of care is leading to devastating health conditions and premature death for many people with the condition.

‘I was moved by the powerful testimony of a person with diabetes who had lost part of his foot as a complication of diabetes’ he added.

The number of Britons diagnosed with diabetes has hit three million for the first time this year, according to figures released earlier this month.

Challenge: APPG chairman and Torbay MP Adrian Sanders says that diabetes is 'one of the greatest challenges we face'

Challenge: APPG chairman and Torbay MP Adrian Sanders says that diabetes is ‘one of the greatest challenges we face’

Nine out of ten people with diabetes have type 2 which occurs when the body gradually loses the ability to process blood sugar, leading to high levels which can damage body organs and years of ill-health. The remainder have type 1 which needs insulin treatment.

Type 2 is strongly linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle and eating an unhealthy diet.

Every year in England and Wales, 24,000 people with diabetes die earlier than expected.

The latest report, which took testimony from patients, NHS staff and experts, says diabetes costs the NHS over £10billion a year – around £1million an hour.

But eighty per cent goes on managing complications, many of which could be prevented, it says.

Mr Sanders, who has type 1 diabetes, said the group heard repeatedly from people who were not receiving nine basic annual checks including blood pressure and blood glucose.

‘Others did not know what checks they had or had not had, or had no record of the results of those checks’ he said.

The number of people receiving all nine checks ranged from six per cent to around 69 per cent depending on the area they lived.

The report found ‘shocking’ variations in levels of amputations – with the majority preventable through good care.

One on four people in nursing homes has diabetes, but many are undiagnosed, said the report.

It follows the Public Accounts Committee diabetes report that highlighted the “depressingly poor” state of diabetes healthcare.

Barbara Young, chief executive of Diabetes UK, said ‘Time and time again we hear about the depressingly poor state of diabetes healthcare, yet we are still waiting to hear how the Government intends to deal with what is fast becoming a crisis.

‘The Government must designate diabetes as a priority and commit to ensuring everyone with diabetes gets good quality care so that they can live long healthy lives.

‘This is why we welcome the All Party Parliament Group for Diabetes’ call for a national implementation plan for improved diabetes care.’

Karen Addington, chief executive of Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, said ‘The Diabetes APPG’s specific demand for increased government funding into type 1 diabetes medical research, echoes our own call.

‘Type 1 diabetes is a serious and challenging condition that affects 400,000 UK children and adults – and cost the country £1.9 billion in 2011.

‘This research and its outcomes would not only improve the lives of those living with type 1 diabetes, but would also help protect the NHS from spiralling costs.’

The comments below have not been moderated.

That’s because the majority of Diabetics are type 2! Who if actually looked after their diet would not have any troubles! I think they should be made to pay for testing strips, they got themselves in that state in the first place! Unlike my 5 yr old, who is type 1 and has no choice in treatment! So I do not sympathise at all!

Walrus Lizard King Fangirl
,

London, UK,
20/3/2013 19:38

A type 2 diabetic has to pay for testing strips, but a drug addict can get access to free needles and their methadone

mum
,

Glasgow, United Kingdom,
20/3/2013 16:54

My husband was given Metformin after he stopped taking statins due to his muscles breaking down and he now has Fybromyalgia and suffers hair loss Metformin also has side effects and last month he was admiited to hospital twice with suspected stroke I read the side effects to metformin and my husbands symtoms were as reported on the leaflet, confusion, loss of memory etc It took time to convince our doctor Since he has been taken off metformin he is much better I understan from my relations in Australia if you have your D and A tested it will show if metformin are suitable for you If this works it would save the NHS a lot of money

hightown
,

Oxfordshire,
20/3/2013 16:43

Diabetes is not a one size fits all condition. Each case will be different depending on age, BMI, diet, family history, cultural practices, medication, other medical conditions and lifestyle etc. There is a distinct difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 is an auto-immune condition which affects around 7% of all people with diabetes, usually in the under 40 age group. It happens when the insulin producing Beta cells are attacked by the immune system and the person then needs daily injections of insulin to stay alive. Historically type 2 happens in the 40+ age group and can be caused by lifestyle, obesity and a genetic predisposition. Type 2 can be controlled by diet, tablets or insulin. There is a wealth of support available. Diabetes healthcare teams in most areas provide courses like DESMOND or DAFNE and charities like DRWF provide free resources and educational days to help people manage their diabetes and prevent or delay the long term complications.

Hal
,

Portsmouth, United Kingdom,
20/3/2013 14:35

One study showed that for type 2 Diabetes 8 weeks of severe calorie restriction greatly improved the Diabetes and the improvement persisted for 7 out of 11 patients.
Obviously this would need to be done under medical supervision as it was in the study but if it really really works surely it would be worth the time and effort.

Alan
,

Sevenoaks,
20/3/2013 14:33

I am amazed at the variable comments on here. I was diagnosed ‘Type 2’ 12 years ago at the GP practise. Suffolk have a Diabetic care scheme which involved attending a Diabetic awareness course run by diabetic specialists and diaticians at West Suffolk hospital. I was put on insulin when Metformin alone was not doing the trick. All my prescription needs ie testing strips etc are on my scripts. I have eye retinopathy tests every year also arranged by the scheme. There is also a twice yearly general follow up check, so maybe I am fortunate in the Suffolk care arrangements, the rest is up to me

manyatrueword
,

silly suffolk,
20/3/2013 14:11

There is no excuse for this, there are national guidelines in place for treating and monitoring diabetics, any institution that does not follow this, then the head of that organisation should be sacked.

solomon 1066
,

bedford,
20/3/2013 13:50

I am type 2. I followed the official NHS advice on diet ie lots of carbs, low fat etc. I put on a lot of weight and my blood glucose was according to my GP, “out of control”. I did lots of research, took myself in hand and followed a low carb diet, including lots of cheese (my favourite food). My weight dropped, 4 st over a year and my BG was within normal range. My GP said, “I don’t know what you’re doing, but keep on doing it” Best advice I can give to other diabetics – find what works for you and stick with it.

Murphycat
,

Exeter,
20/3/2013 13:24

Simpy stop eating grains and sugar, and watch your diabetes disappear! Elegantly simple, so why doesn’t your doctor give you that advice? MONEY! The Medical Mafia gets poor when you get well. They DO NOT want to heal you, they want to manage your illness forever. Run away from conventional medicine, it will kill you, period!

Conk
,

Huntsville,
20/3/2013 13:16

Those checkups do absolutely nothing to help any diabetics control their carbohydrate intake or sugar levels unless the patient is able to monitor their own glucose levels at home before and after they eat! Diabetics are told to cut out sugar, sweats and cakes and watch fats but don’t know the difference between a good lower carb diet and the poor one they are advised continually to eat. It’s a fact that knowledgeable diabetics have had to learn by trial and error and most Doctors and Dietitians are only allowed to tell you what they are told to tell patients even when they know different!. Type twos and the overweight have slower metabolism due to too many carbs poly fats so advising them to eat wholemeal, grain and more low GI carbs is wrong ineffective for lowering blood glucose levels, having more brain energy, losing weight and avoiding serious health problems. Sugar, Grain, flour and some dairy items and seed fat oils are the real enemies of the liver and immune system.

sunseeker12
,

Somerset,
20/3/2013 13:14

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Deep-sea diving tank combined with injections of a patient's own stem cells to …

By
Roger Dobson

22:48 EST, 11 March 2013


|

23:38 EST, 11 March 2013

Sitting in a diving chamber may be a new treatment for type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the condition.

Scientists are combining the treatment with injections of a patient’s own stem cells in a bid to kick-start insulin production.

They believe the high levels of oxygen in the chamber boosts the activity of the stem cells, helping them to repair the cells in the body that produce insulin.

There are around 2.9 million Britons with diabetes, with most of them suffering from type 2

There are around 2.9 million Britons with diabetes, with most of them suffering from type 2

In a new trial, patients with type 2 diabetes reduced their need for insulin and metformin (a common diabetes drug) with some no longer needing the insulin at all.

So-called hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves a patient sitting in a pressurised chamber.

The high-pressure atmosphere means they breathe in three times as much oxygen as they would normally.

The treatment is normally used for helping divers who have surfaced too quickly and have the ‘bends’ (where bubbles of nitrogen form in the blood).

It’s also used for carbon monoxide poisoning and to speed up wound healing such as leg ulcers.

Studies suggest high levels of oxygen boosts activity of stem cells  — the so-called blank slate cells that can turn into any cell of the body — helping them to replace and heal ailing cells.

A study at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine showed that a course of hyperbaric oxygen treatment triggers an eight-fold increase in the number of circulating stem cells, possibly by boosting the activity of enzymes involved in the release and activity of stem cells.

The new treatment involves scientists extracting a patient’s stem cells, multiplying them in the lab and then injecting them back into the pancreas (this organ produces the hormone insulin, which mops up blood sugar).

Combining this treatment with the oxygen chamber increases the activity of the stem cells, boosting their healing powers.

In some cases, it is possible to control symptoms through lifestyle changes, such as a healthy diet

In some cases, it is possible to control symptoms through lifestyle changes, such as a healthy diet

Patients receive injections of their own stem cells into the pancreas before and after entering the diving chamber.

There are around 2.9 million Britons with diabetes, with most of them suffering from type 2, where not enough insulin is produced to maintain a normal blood sugar level, or the cells of the body become resistant to its effect.

Diabetes cannot be cured, but there are treatments that aim to keep blood glucose levels as normal as possible to control symptoms and lower the risk of complications.

In some cases, it is possible to control symptoms through lifestyle changes, such as a healthy diet.

But drugs such as metformin (which reduces glucose production by the liver) or injected therapies such as insulin may become necessary.

The new treatment, which is being investigated at a number of centres across the world, involves extracting stem cells from the patient’s bone marrow under local anaesthetic and injecting them into the pancreas.

In a trial at Miami University, 25 patients had five hour-long sessions of hyperbaric oxygen treatment before and after the injections, over the course of a week.

All the patients were taking either metformin or insulin, or both.

Four patients were able to stop using their insulin after the combined treatment.

Fifteen of the patients could gradually reduce their insulin over the following year, while ten stopped or reduced their metformin dose, it was reported in the journal Cell Transplantation.

Commenting on the study, Dr Matthew Hobbs, Diabetes UK Head of Research, said: ‘Although any stem cell therapies for type 1 and type 2 diabetes are many years away from widespread clinical use, researchers agree that stem cells hold great potential to treat and perhaps even cure a range of different health conditions.

‘Stem cell research is an exciting area of science that, in the long term, could help us bring about a future without diabetes.’

________________________________________________

Meanwhile, children and teenagers with recently diagnosed type 1 diabetes are being given daily vitamin D pills in a new clinical trial.

There is evidence vitamin D may help treat autoimmmune conditions by dampening inflammation.

In most cases of newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, patients go through a period of partial remission. The new study, at the Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Ohio, prescribes vitamin D supplements during this time.

 

The comments below have not been moderated.

Type 2 diabetes is a condition of insulin RESISTANCE, not failure to produce, and is totally curable, in very little time, by getting to the root cause of the condition – overconsumption of CARBOHYDRATES, soya and vegetable oils. Those making a lot of money out of ‘treating’ the condition with drugs and would prefer you to be chronically ill of course, because there is no profit in health. Might be useful for type 1, but not for type 2 (or type 3 aka Alzheimers)
– Libertarian , York, United Kingdom

WRONG, that is only one type of type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is only one type, you can also have genetic predisposition and have a pancrease that doesn’t function effectively, and you can even have one type where your body attacks the insulin and cells that produce the insulin. You did hit on an important thing though, lately medicine has not cured anything because there is more money treating diseases…greed hurting mankind again.

Hojo
,

Virginia Beach, United States,
12/3/2013 13:02

IF you mean TYPE 2 diabetes then please say so in the HEADLINE and not just in the article. Diabetes has two types and I think that most of the media who should know better, who insist on classing both types as the same, are doing so in order to make the headlines more noteworthy. The headline is so misleading as it doesn’t relate to diabetes but to type 2 diabetes. Why not put that?
Heather Shorrock

Heather Shorrock
,

Kirkham, United Kingdom,
12/3/2013 12:03

WHY don’t you mention type 2 in the headline instead of in the subtext? When people glance at headlines it is usually something similar to this one. DIABETES has two types. Both are very different. It should be mentioned in the headline and not halfway through the article. I am sure that it is done on purpose – why else would newspapers and the rest of the media insist on doing it whenever there is an article regarding type 2 diabetes? PLEASE state type 2 if that is what the article is about, in the HEADLINE
Heather Shorrock

Heather Shorrock
,

Kirkham, United Kingdom,
12/3/2013 11:58

I have HBOT for MS. I haven’t had a relapse in the 8 years I’ve been having it.

Teresa
,

BRIDGEND,
12/3/2013 09:34

Losing weight doesn’t always help. With some forms of diabetes some parts of your pancreas are dead. Losing weight does not reanimated necrotic tissue. I am thin and in shape and still have diabetes, I believe it was caused by aspartame in diet sodas.

Hojo
,

Virginia Beach, United States,
12/3/2013 09:24

Type 2 diabetes is a condition of insulin RESISTANCE, not failure to produce, and is totally curable, in very little time, by getting to the root cause of the condition – overconsumption of CARBOHYDRATES, soya and vegetable oils. Those making a lot of money out of ‘treating’ the condition with drugs and would prefer you to be chronically ill of course, because there is no profit in health. Might be useful for type 1, but not for type 2 (or type 3 aka Alzheimers)

Libertarian
,

York, United Kingdom,
12/3/2013 09:22

I have just completed sessions in a hyperbaric chamber for sudden hearing loss probably caused by a virus. This treatment was combined with a short course of cortisone injections. I cannot believe that my hearing slowly but surely returned. I was very doubtful that the hyperbaric treatment would work but it has. So I sincerely hope that Diabetes sufferers will also experience positive results.

JVMila
,

London, United Kingdom,
12/3/2013 07:11

the best cure to treat diabetes type 2 is losing weight! much cheaper on the healthcare pocket too…

sunshine
,

Amsterdam,
12/3/2013 06:29

Twelve years ago, Professor Irving Weissman discovered a treatment that could have saved the lives of thousands of women with advanced breast cancer. Pharmaceutical companies weren¿t interested in developing the therapy at the time.
Though interest in his methods are finally being ignited, Weissman regrets the wasted time. In a set of lectures, Weissman repeatedly expressed frustration that while many of his discoveries in the field of stem cell research seemed to hold remarkable potential for life-saving treatments, commercial or regulatory hurdles have prevented his scientific findings from benefiting patients.
One example is Weissman¿s research on type I diabetes, in which he demonstrated the ability to fully cure type I diabetes in mice using stem cells. But even though his experiments avoided political controversy by using adult stem cells, which do not come from embryos, Weissman ran into a road block when pharmaceutical companies refused to sponsor clinical trials.

jondoeuk
,

cardiff, United Kingdom,
12/3/2013 05:51

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Forget the gym: You could avoid diabetes by getting up to chat to a colleague

  • Cutting the time people spend sitting down by 90 minutes a day could reduce Type 2 diabetes risk
  • Scientists in Leicester suggest physical activity advice should be amended as a consequence

By
Jenny Hope and Emma Innes

09:03 EST, 28 February 2013


|

09:03 EST, 28 February 2013

Being less sedentary all the time could be more beneficial than going to the gym, claim scientists

Being less sedentary all the time could be more beneficial than going to the gym, claim scientists

Forget the gym – getting up from your desk to chat to a colleague a few times a day may be all that is required to prevent Type 2 diabetes.

New research suggests people at high risk of developing diabetes may be able to escape the condition by cutting the time they spending sitting down by 90 minutes every day.

Consequently, official advice recommending 150 minutes of physical activity each week should be amended to encourage people to be less sedentary all the time, say studies from Leicester University.

They found important risk factors for Type 2 diabetes, such as blood glucose and cholesterol levels, improved far more in people told to sit less, compared with those doing required amounts of exercise.

Research leader Joseph Henson said: ‘These studies provide preliminary evidence that sedentary behaviour may be a more effective way to target the prevention of Type 2 diabetes, rather than just solely focusing on physical activity.

‘Moreover, sedentary time occupies large portions of the day, unlike moderate to vigorous physical activity.’

Type 2 diabetes mostly affects middle-aged people and occurs when the body gradually loses the ability to process blood sugar, leading to high levels which can damage body organs and years of ill-health.

It is strongly linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle and eating an unhealthy diet.

Patients from two studies on activity levels and diabetes were investigated by a team from the Diabetes Research Unit at Leicester University.

The patients, who were at high risk of developing diabetes, ranged in age from early 30s to late 60s.

The team examined the extent to which sedentary time, breaks in sedentary time, vigorous exercise and total physical activity were linked with cardiometabolic risk factors in a population with known risk factors for Type 2 diabetes.

These include blood sugar and cholesterol levels.

Those who spent longer sitting down had risk factors that were 'detrimentally' linked to diabetes

Those who spent longer sitting down had risk factors that were ‘detrimentally’ linked to diabetes

They found those who spent longer periods of time sitting had risk factors that were ‘detrimentally’ linked to diabetes whatever their age.

Sedentary time had stronger links with negative scores than improvements brought about by vigorous exercise, says a report in Diabetologia (The journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes).

Mr Henson said the research suggested that cutting sitting time by 90 minutes a day would significantly help people at risk.

‘Along with messages related to accumulating at least 150 min per week of moderate to vigorous physical activity, which form the cornerstone of diabetes prevention programmes, such interventions may be more effective still if individuals are further encouraged to simply sit less and move more, regardless of the intensity level,’ he added.

There is growing evidence which suggests too much sitting – as opposed to insufficient activity – may be a new risk factor for premature death and illness.

The study comes after US research showing office workers who sit for more than four hours a day are at greater risk of chronic illnesses such as diabetes and heart disease.

It found those sitting for at least six hours were significantly more likely to have diabetes.

Dr Matthew Hobbs, Head of Research at Diabetes UK, said: ‘This study adds to the extensive evidence that spending a lot of time sitting or lying down is linked to an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes and that being more physically active can help to reduce this risk.

‘The suggestion that time spent sitting or lying down may be a more important indicator of poor health than a lack of moderate or vigorous exercise is interesting. However, this is not yet confirmed and must be proven with further research.

‘What is clear is that anyone who spends a lot of time sitting or lying down could benefit from spending more time being physically active, regardless of the type of activity involved.

‘Finding activities that you enjoy and can incorporate into your daily life, such as walking, gardening, DIY or housework, is the best way to achieve this.’