Scarlett Johansson says respect my privacy

So apparently some naked Scarlett Johansson photos have emerged on the internet. And apparently they were acquired by less-than-savoury means. The star claims the culprit hacked her phone and extracted the images.

In a recent interview with CNN she said, all she wanted was to have her privacy respected.

“Just because you’re an actor or make films or whatever doesn’t mean you’re not entitled to your own personal privacy,” she says in the interview. “If that is sieged in some way, it feels unjust. It feels wrong.”

Scarlett Johansson is not so happy about having her muff plastered all over the web

Speaking of life in the spotlight, the 26-year-old actress added: As for life in the spotlight, the actress, 26, says: “It’s an adjustment, but I think there are certain instances where you give a lot of yourself and finally you have to kind of put your foot down and say, ‘Oh wait, I’m taking it back.’ ”

Poor old Scaz. It must be difficult being that hot. Especially when people are evidently prepared to go to stupid lengths to get a glance of you in the buff. Fortunately for her, Johansson’s career doesn’t really need boosting, as she is a standard A-lister, so I can’t claim that perhaps this is all a desperate publicity stunt (a la Paris Hilton or Kim Kardashian, who seem to STILL be surviving off those boring sex tapes).

And Scarlett is so furious that she’s got the FBI on the case. The agency is looking into who might have released the nude photos allegedly hacked from the private cell phone, according to an official.

The FBI is already investigating some 50 other celebrity email accounts that might also have been hacked, including those belonging to Vanessa Hudgens and Jessica Alba, says Fox News.

Three months ago, alleged hackers claimed to have nude photos of Blake Lively whose rep was quick to threaten legal action against any website that made the photos public.

Click here to read all about the photos and to see LOTS OF NAKED PHOTOS OF SCARLETT JOHANSSON (we cannot guarantee their authenticity).

Images: Wikipedia

Bond with friends to live longer

A recently conducted study has revealed that people who have little or no social interaction are at greater risk of dying early than those who are social. According to www.sify.com, a team of researchers have analysed the data of 148 studies that involved 300,000 individuals and concluded that people who are socially connected live for about 3.7 years more than others.

The study has come as an eye opener for people who give no importance to having friends and mingling with people. During the study, researchers also compared the ramifications of having no friends with alcoholics and obese.

As a result of which they established that living a life in total seclusion leads to risk of mortality faced by alcoholics and obese or physically inactive beings.

As reported by www.way2online.com, the researchers also stated that friends can make life easier on a day-today level. Bert Uchino, lead researcher of the study from Brigham Young University went on to add: “They can lend you money, offer lifts or provide baby-sitting. They can also encourage you to have better health practices, see a doctor, exercise more. They may also help you indirectly by making you feel you have something to live for.”

He concluded that people should maintain their relationships with friends as for those who do not have any, should try and develop some.

Several celebrities have battled obesity. These include Sharon Osbourne,Oprah WinfreyJohn Candy and Kirstie Alley.

Images: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1181506, http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1095867

Firm handshake hints at longer life

A recent study has brought to fore a revelation that might change the way people shake hands with others. According to www.bbc.co.uk, a team of British scientists have discovered that just a simple handshake can determine whether an individual will have a long or short life. In other words, the strength of a handshake can determine life expectancy.

Researchers at the Medical Research Council accessed the disposition of volunteers from 33 countries who were in the age bracket of 18 to 80 years.

According to www.news.com.au, the study also examined the way people get up from sitting in a chair and their style of walking. Their ability to grip something as well as the pace at which they get up or walk also helped determine their life expectancy.

Commenting on the findings, researcher Dr Rachel Cooper said: “Simple non-invasive assessment measures like these, that are linked to current and future health, could help doctors identify those most vulnerable to poor health in later life and who may benefit from early intervention to keep them active for longer,” However, the panel of scientists added that further research is required to establish a clinical prediction of the survival rate among younger counterparts.

Images: US Army on and MJTR Flikr

Predict the chances of long life through a genetic test

According to a health report published by www.guardian.co.uk, a genetic test can now be used to predict whether a person will live for 100 years or not. The researchers at Boston University are the masterminds behind this test and claim that it can be used to identify people who will have a long life.

The accuracy of the test is being judged at 77%. It was designed after the researchers conducted a major study into the genetic structure of people who have lived for 100 years and found out a number of variants in the DNA that make a difference to a person’s life. They also found out that living 100 years is generally hereditary.

According to www.independent.co.uk, the scientists believe that having good genes is one of the keys to surviving for 100 years, aside from environmental and lifestyle effects.

Researcher Sebastiani is of the view that “There are particular combinations of these genetic variants that allow people to live not only a longer life, but also a healthier life. In centenarians, disability and disease tend to be delayed until the very end of their lives.”

Images: Wikimedia Commons