William Petit Joins Company Developing Diabetes Device

Dr. William Petit is a partner in a company that’s developing a new device for testing diabetes.

Petit is one of four principals in Quick LLC, a Farmington-based company that announced Thursday the start of a fundraising campaign to raise money for developing a prototype of the device and testing it.

Petit said he got involved with the company because it’s an opportunity to be involved with something that could solve the long-discussed problem of how to make it easier to measure glucose levels in diabetes patients. He is friends with Scott Fox, the president and CEO of the company.

“Over the course of a number of rounds of golf, he told me about what was going on,” Petit said.

David Mucci and Ron Clark, both doctors at the Hospital of Central Connecticut who developed the device, demonstrated it to Petit.

Instead of using a finger prick to test blood, the device measures glucose levels in saliva. It’s easier and less painful, Petit said, especially for people who need to test themselves several times each day. Some people don’t test themselves as often as they should, Petit said, because of the pain and inconvenience.

“It’s a fascinating idea and I give credit to Dave Mucci and Ron Clark,” he said in a telephone interview. “People have been looking for ways to measure glucose levels for some time.”

The device also connects to smartphones so that parents can track their children’s tests.

A former medical director of the Joslin Diabetes Center at the Hospital of Central Connecticut, Petit hasn’t practiced medicine since 2007, when his wife and two daughters were killed in a brutal attack in their home. Since that ordeal, he has worked for the Petit Family Foundation, which has raised and donated more than $1 million to causes that match the interests of his wife and daughters.

He has also advocated for reforming the state’s death penalty law and has served with the Hartford County Medical Association and the Connecticut State Medical Society.

The new device, called the iQuickIt Saliva Analyzer, has been in development for about 18 months, Fox said. The company hopes to raise $100,000 over the next two months on the crowdsourcing website Indiegogo.com, which allows people to raise money for specific goals with contributions from many people.

Fox, Mucci and Clark are the founders of the company. They brought Petit onto the management team to serve as the diabetes advisor. Among other tasks, he’ll oversee the clinical trials when the device gets to that stage.

In a best-case scenario, Fox said, the device could be on the market in about two years.

Petit made news earlier this month when he confirmed that he was considering running for Congress. Petit said Thursday he was still considering a run for the Republican candidacy in the 5th District, and is weighing the time it requires to other commitments, including the foundation, his work with Quick LLC and the fact that he and his new wife are expecting a baby in six weeks.

Diabetes! You got to be kidding.

It is not exactly a lifestyle issue. Nor does it spread through human contact or viruses. Nevertheless, it is raging ahead, disrupting lives of many children, making them dependent on syringes and pumps for insulin.

Juvenile or type-I diabetes, which forces dependency on insulin, is on a rapid rise in the city.

It is only when parents consult doctors after noticing symptoms like sudden weight loss, frequent urination, restlessness, fatigue, increased hunger and thirst in their child, that this dark truth stems out.

Dr Sharath Chandran from a diabetes centre, Diabetacare, says many children and adolescents are getting detected, “some as young as a few months, to those in their late teens.”

Doctors say that unlike type-II diabetes, which generally strikes during adulthood and is a consequence of lifestyle reasons like obesity, juvenile diabetes does not have any particular lifestyle causes.

“It is usually owing to the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. But why exactly does this happens to some kids is not really known,” says Dr Anjana Hulse, paediatric endocrinologist from Apollo Hospital.

However, if one parent has type-I diabetes, chances of the child being a juvenile diabetic are high, says Dr Hulse.

Challenges for kids

Furthermore, the ailment hampers social and emotional well-being of children to a certain extent, say doctors.

“The child has to be cautious of his or her sugar levels, since they can experience very high or low sugar. And control their diets. All this requires lot of preparations and acceptance, specially on the part of the child,” says
Dr Hulse.

Deepa Lokhande, a diabetes educator in the city, says counselling and confidence-building are important among children.

“Since it calls for insulin, helping them overcome needle phobia and training them to take their insulin shots is crucial as it involves specified areas for taking insulin, right time etc.”

Meanwhile, parents say being diagnosed with juvenile diabetes affects children in every possible way, right from playing, eating, school, friends to birthday parties and so on.

Diet restrictions at a tender age

Madhu L, mother of a 14-year-old diabetic boy in the city, says, though her son has accepted his ailment, there are times when he broods as he cannot eat everything like his friends do.

“Initially, it was really tough to convince him that insulin is good for him and he needs to take it regularly. He would often ask why his friends don’t take it.”

While Prakash Kumar, father of a 15-year-old diabetic boy, says monitoring if the child has taken insulin on time during the school and tuition hours is difficult.

“My son has to be physically active to control his diabetes. With increasing studies and tuitions, it is not always possible to find time for exercises,” says Prakash.

Is obesity a laughing matter? | Tom Shone | Film | theguardian.com

“Nine out of 10 of the guys I fuck are black guys!” yells Melissa McCarthy merrily from her car window in the new comedy The Heat. The film is one of those cop-buddy flicks like 48 Hours, in which an uptight pencil-pusher finds himself partnered with a slovenly renegade in order to solve a crime, the twist being that both pencil-pusher and renegade here are both women: the former played by Sandra Bullock, who cannot disguise her disgust at her new partner detective Mullins (Melissa McCarthy), a Red Sox fan in plus-size sweatpants and a T-shirt dating back to 1978, with hair like a haystack, who sits munching on red-hot chili peppers, as if to heat up the torrents of filth that spill from her mouth. “What is this,” asks a bewildered Bullock. “Training Day?”

No, just a follow-up of sorts to director Paul Feig’s 2010 hit, Bridesmaids, which starred McCarthy as a lusty gun-loving hip-thrusting man-eater in a newsboy cap, sandwiched in with all the stick-thin bridesmaids as if nothing was amiss.

“Megan was a cartoon of aggressive sexuality, wildly, crudely lusty,” said Time critic Mary Pols. “She’s two parodies at once – the butch girl and the man everyone runs from at a cocktail party – braided together with the joke of a plus-sized figure.”

Although not everyone was as alert to the nuance of McCarthy’s schtick. “Melissa McCarthy is a gimmick comedian who has devoted her short career to being obese and obnoxious with equal success,” wrote Rex Reed in a review of a subsequent film of McCarthy’s, Identity Thief, which called McCarthy a “female hippo” and “tractor-sized”.

Responding to those comments in the New York Times last week, McCarthy said:

I felt really bad for someone who is swimming in so much hate. I just thought, that’s someone who’s in a really bad spot, and I am in such a happy spot. I laugh my head off every day with my husband and my kids who are mooning me and singing me songs.

Reed then came back with this:

My point was that I object to using health issues like obesity as comic talking points … [McCarthy] is basing her career on being obnoxious and being overweight. And I don’t think that’s funny. I have too many friends that have died of obesity-related illnesses, heart problems and diabetes, and I have actually lost friends to this. I have helped people try to lose weight, and I don’t find this to be the subject of a lot of humor. I have a perfect right to say that. My review was really more about the movie and about the character she plays in the movie than it is about her. I don’t care how much she weighs.

Reed’s initial comments were vile, and his attempts to spin them as concern for the obese is laughable, but his wriggling does inadvertently shed light on a thorny matter. Weight has traditionally been comic fodder – even, and sometimes especially, by those who wield it. The fat man as comic figure goes all the way back to Fatty Arbuckle, although a lot of that ‘fat’ was actually muscle. Arbuckle was extraordinarily graceful in the way he moved, refusing gags in which he got stuck in windows or doorways, instead seeking out skits of physical liberation – a ballet sequence in which he pirhouettes across the stage (Back Stage), or a dance in which he juggles pots and pans before spinning pies like discus across the room (The Cook).

Director Mack Sennett, recounting his first meeting with Arbuckle, said he “skipped up the stairs as lightly as Fred Astaire” and, “without warning went into a feather light step, clapped his hands and did a backward somersault as graceful as a girl tumbler”.

It’s a curious paradox of the fat clown – and one missed entirely by the modern phenomenon of “fat suits” – that he must have more control, more balance, more understanding of their plumb-lines than a skinny one, not less. Oliver Hardy was revealed as a graceful dancer in the Laurel and Hardy shorts. John Belushi executed a perfect series of cartwheels and backflips in The Blues Brothers. John Candy showed off his martial arts prowess in Delirious. Jack Black gave a remarkable display of body-popping in High Fidelity, spinning like a human top. The reason should be obvious, even to someone as lethargic in his critical perceptions as Reed: comedy, even physical comedy, is not a form that favors heaviness of effect. It is an art of precisely calibration, Quartz watch timing and gymnastic balance. It aspires to a state of weightlessness.

By that measure, The Heat is not much. It is too long, for one thing, the scenes burrowing into themselves to turn up good bits of improv, and relying on one too many jokes that do trade on McCarthy’s weight: wriggling her way out of a parked car through the window, spewing profanity all the way, for example. But what was true of Arbuckle is also true of McCarthy: she is remarkably lithe, as that vertical leg hoist in Bridesdmaids first told us, and there are a number of scenes here – most notably one in which she leads Bullock onto the dancefloor in a sting operation – that showcase that nimbleness.

And needless to say, when she opens her mouth and lets loose with one of those geysers of obscenity – on everything from her boss’s tiny balls to her new partner’s vagina – you just sit back and enjoy the ride. In those moments alone, the movie achieves take-off.

Is obesity a laughing matter? | Tom Shone | Film | guardian.co.uk

“Nine out of 10 of the guys I fuck are black guys!” yells Melissa McCarthy merrily from her car window in the new comedy The Heat. The film is one of those cop-buddy flicks like 48 Hours, in which an uptight pencil-pusher finds himself partnered with a slovenly renegade in order to solve a crime, the twist being that both pencil-pusher and renegade here are both women: the former played by Sandra Bullock, who cannot disguise her disgust at her new partner detective Mullins (Melissa McCarthy), a Red Sox fan in plus-size sweatpants and a T-shirt dating back to 1978, with hair like a haystack, who sits munching on red-hot chili peppers, as if to heat up the torrents of filth that spill from her mouth. “What is this,” asks a bewildered Bullock. “Training Day?”

No, just a follow-up of sorts to director Paul Feig’s 2010 hit, Bridesmaids, which starred McCarthy as a lusty gun-loving hip-thrusting man-eater in a newsboy cap, sandwiched in with all the stick-thin bridesmaids as if nothing was amiss.

“Megan was a cartoon of aggressive sexuality, wildly, crudely lusty,” said Time critic Mary Pols. “She’s two parodies at once – the butch girl and the man everyone runs from at a cocktail party – braided together with the joke of a plus-sized figure.”

Although not everyone was as alert to the nuance of McCarthy’s schtick. “Melissa McCarthy is a gimmick comedian who has devoted her short career to being obese and obnoxious with equal success,” wrote Rex Reed in a review of a subsequent film of McCarthy’s, Identity Thief, which called McCarthy a “female hippo” and “tractor-sized”.

Responding to those comments in the New York Times last week, McCarthy said:

I felt really bad for someone who is swimming in so much hate. I just thought, that’s someone who’s in a really bad spot, and I am in such a happy spot. I laugh my head off every day with my husband and my kids who are mooning me and singing me songs.

Reed then came back with this:

My point was that I object to using health issues like obesity as comic talking points … [McCarthy] is basing her career on being obnoxious and being overweight. And I don’t think that’s funny. I have too many friends that have died of obesity-related illnesses, heart problems and diabetes, and I have actually lost friends to this. I have helped people try to lose weight, and I don’t find this to be the subject of a lot of humor. I have a perfect right to say that. My review was really more about the movie and about the character she plays in the movie than it is about her. I don’t care how much she weighs.

Reed’s initial comments were vile, and his attempts to spin them as concern for the obese is laughable, but his wriggling does inadvertently shed light on a thorny matter. Weight has traditionally been comic fodder – even, and sometimes especially, by those who wield it. The fat man as comic figure goes all the way back to Fatty Arbuckle, although a lot of that ‘fat’ was actually muscle. Arbuckle was extraordinarily graceful in the way he moved, refusing gags in which he got stuck in windows or doorways, instead seeking out skits of physical liberation – a ballet sequence in which he pirhouettes across the stage (Back Stage), or a dance in which he juggles pots and pans before spinning pies like discus across the room (The Cook).

Director Mack Sennett, recounting his first meeting with Arbuckle, said he “skipped up the stairs as lightly as Fred Astaire” and, “without warning went into a feather light step, clapped his hands and did a backward somersault as graceful as a girl tumbler”.

It’s a curious paradox of the fat clown – and one missed entirely by the modern phenomenon of “fat suits” – that he must have more control, more balance, more understanding of their plumb-lines than a skinny one, not less. Oliver Hardy was revealed as a graceful dancer in the Laurel and Hardy shorts. John Belushi executed a perfect series of cartwheels and backflips in The Blues Brothers. John Candy showed off his martial arts prowess in Delirious. Jack Black gave a remarkable display of body-popping in High Fidelity, spinning like a human top. The reason should be obvious, even to someone as lethargic in his critical perceptions as Reed: comedy, even physical comedy, is not a form that favors heaviness of effect. It is an art of precisely calibration, Quartz watch timing and gymnastic balance. It aspires to a state of weightlessness.

By that measure, The Heat is not much. It is too long, for one thing, the scenes burrowing into themselves to turn up good bits of improv, and relying on one too many jokes that do trade on McCarthy’s weight: wriggling her way out of a parked car through the window, spewing profanity all the way, for example. But what was true of Arbuckle is also true of McCarthy: she is remarkably lithe, as that vertical leg hoist in Bridesdmaids first told us, and there are a number of scenes here – most notably one in which she leads Bullock onto the dancefloor in a sting operation – that showcase that nimbleness.

And needless to say, when she opens her mouth and lets loose with one of those geysers of obscenity – on everything from her boss’s tiny balls to her new partner’s vagina – you just sit back and enjoy the ride. In those moments alone, the movie achieves take-off.

Controversial Rihanna Admits She is a C***.

Barbadian songstress Rihanna has been grabbing more attention for her very famous herself, this time by wearing a necklace that spelled out what other sites have referred to as ‘the ‘c’ word’ and have labelled inappropriate. I think they mean the word ‘c***’ and I don’t think it’s ever been more appropriate.

[adsense]Rihanna’s always twatting about in front of us wearing as little as possible in order to display what little talent she’s got, but this time she’s really pushed the boundaries by wearing the c*** necklace whilst inside a place of worship – yes, a church. Wowie – it’s like Madonna snogging a black priest all over again. And Lady Gagagagaga and all the desperate stuff she does in order to be seen as controversial, even though she’s just a crap little girl with horrific taste in clothes trying to be Madonna and every other influential female artist of the last three decades.

It seems that Rihanna and Lady Gaga are constantly playing catch up with each other over who can garner the most publicity for their ridiculous public personas based around tasteless clothes; with poor feeble Kate Perry only managing a paltry amount of attention for her safe girl-next-door coloured wigs and curiosity as to why the likes of Russell Brand would want to marry someone as girly and dull as she seems to be.

Anyway, the Umbrella singer was sightseeing in a Brazilian chapel in Rio de Janeiro, either on holiday after her previous holiday yachting around Europe with a coven of her cackling female friends who probably only hang out with her because she’s rich, unless of course it was all a planned exercise in media attention grabbing. Call me cynical. One of the most famous churches in the world in a very sacred country, some jumped up brat with one song to her name that she probably didn’t write, wearing a necklace with a naughty word on it – how very Madonna of her.

Rihanna is not the first celebrity to wear a ‘c*** necklace’, Natalie Portman and Julia Roberts wore theirs years ago, so she’s not even original. And Charlie Sheen wears one on a regular basis, although his charges by the hour.

Rihanna is currently on tour with her lovely Umbrella rhyme and was having a day off from performing it partially naked, to enjoy a sightseeing trip.

The entire day was very eventful as according to one website,  ‘at one point, she [Rihanna] leaned over and took in the spectacular view while sipping a drink.’ Achingly descriptive. I feel like I was really there. When people ask me in years to come where I was when Rihanna leaned over and sipped a drink, I can happily say that I was having my colon irrigated in East Village.

Earlier in the week, Rihanna was spotted on the beach with friends, sipping cocktails and having a henna tattoo – wow she’s just like one of us, only inexplicably exceptionally famous and rich.

Rihanna will appear on stage tomorrow night at the Rock in Rio festival where hopefully she will perform her famous Umbrella song whilst watched intently by her fan.

It’s not the first time Rihanna has exposed her c*** in public and no doubt it won’t be the last.

David Schwimmer and Zoe Buckman expecting their first child

Friends star David Schwimmer and his wife, British photographer Zoe Buckman, are expecting their first baby together.

The actor’s rep told People that the couple “couldn’t be more thrilled”.  The 44-year-old married his 25-year-old girlfriend in June this year in a small secret ceremony. They met in London in 2007 while Schwimmer was directing the romantic comedy Run, Fat Boy, Run starring Simon Pegg and Thandie Newton, People reports.

Buckman was waitressing at the Cuckoo Club in London’s West End when she served Schwimmer. She later left her home in North London to move to Los Angeles to be closer to the star.

In March, the pair announced their engagement and in October a rep confirmed to People that they had been already been married for four months.

News of Schwimmer’s wedding surfaced on the same day as Courtney Cox, his on-screen sister Monica in the show Friends, announced she was separating from her husband of 11 years, David Arquette.

Schwimmer had spoken to People in 2006, expressing his wish to become a father, but in due time.

“I think it’s gonna have to wait until I settle down and have a family,” he said. “It will happen when it feels right. Maybe part of me is waiting for myself to slow down a little and be ready to stay put. I’m confident it’s gonna happen.”

Schwimmer, who is notoriously private, has been linked with a handful of glamorous women including Australian singer Natalie Imbruglia and model Gina Lee, according to the Daily Mail. Prior to meeting Buckman he was reportedly engaged to Israeli actress Mili Avital.

Other celebs who have recently announced they are pregnant include singers Mariah Carey, Beyonce and Pink, Ex-Miss California Carrie Prejean and Amazing Race couple Chad and Stephanie.

Images: Wikimedia Commons

Courteney Cox and David Arquette announce split

Friends star Courteney Cox and David Arquette announced that they are  splitting up after 11 years of marriage. The actors have been separated for several months, reports TMZ, but they are “still friends”.

David announced on the Howard Stern Show today that he slept with 28-year-old bartender Jasmine Waltz, insisting however that he had not been unfaithful to Courteney, who he describes as “an amazing woman”. Part of the terms of their separation he said, was that they were both allowed to see other people.

There are claims that 46-year-old Cox has been involved with her Cougar Town co-star Brian Van Holt, and Arquette also mentioned to Stern that he knew the two were involved in an “emotional affair”, although he did not know if it had developed into something physical.

Cox and Arquette, who met while filming Scream in 1996, have a six-year-old daughter called Coco.

They issued a joint statement,saying: “The reason for this separation is to better understand ourselves and the qualities we need in a partner and for our marriage.

“We remain best friends and responsible parents to our daughter and we still love each other deeply.

“As we go though this process we are determined to use kindness and understanding to get through this together.

“We are comfortable with the boundaries we have established for each other during this separation and we hope that our friends, family, fans and the media also show us respect, dignity, understanding and love at this time as well.”

Read our coverage about former Friends star Jennifer Aniston and whether she is a commitment phobic.

Images: PR Photos

Bond with friends to live longer

A recently conducted study has revealed that people who have little or no social interaction are at greater risk of dying early than those who are social. According to www.sify.com, a team of researchers have analysed the data of 148 studies that involved 300,000 individuals and concluded that people who are socially connected live for about 3.7 years more than others.

The study has come as an eye opener for people who give no importance to having friends and mingling with people. During the study, researchers also compared the ramifications of having no friends with alcoholics and obese.

As a result of which they established that living a life in total seclusion leads to risk of mortality faced by alcoholics and obese or physically inactive beings.

As reported by www.way2online.com, the researchers also stated that friends can make life easier on a day-today level. Bert Uchino, lead researcher of the study from Brigham Young University went on to add: “They can lend you money, offer lifts or provide baby-sitting. They can also encourage you to have better health practices, see a doctor, exercise more. They may also help you indirectly by making you feel you have something to live for.”

He concluded that people should maintain their relationships with friends as for those who do not have any, should try and develop some.

Several celebrities have battled obesity. These include Sharon Osbourne,Oprah WinfreyJohn Candy and Kirstie Alley.

Images: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1181506, http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1095867