Bob Marley's death from cancer was preventable

Bob Marley

Reggae legend Robert Nesta “Bob” Marley died of cancer on May 11th 1981 at the age of 36. The illness stemmed from an innocuous toe injury sustained during a football game in May 1977. Due to his Rastafari belief that the body must remain “whole”, Marley refused to have his toe amputated even after doctors found a form of malignant melanoma – a less common and very dangerous form of skin cancer – in the wound in July of that year. Despite his distrust of medical doctors he let an orthopaedic surgeon perform a skin graft on his toe but that didn’t stop the cancer’s growth and it eventually spread to his lungs, liver, stomach and brain.

Marley collapsed while jogging in New York’s Central Park after playing two shows as part of his autumn 1980 Uprising Tour. The tour was cancelled, but Marley played one last concert at the Stanley Theatre in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on September 23rd 1980. The most famous live version of “Redemption Song” was recorded at that concert.

Towards the end of his life, Marley sought the help of German physician Josef Issels, who offered him an alternative treatment for the cancer. The “Issels” Treatment is based on holistic principles and involves eliminating certain substances from the diet, having specialised vaccines and vitamin supplements, and chelation and enzymatic therapies, not unlike the work Dr Gabriel Cousens is currently doing in Arizona.

The method is unapproved in the UK and deemed ineffective by the American Cancer Society.

Bob Marley could have prevented his death by cancer

Bob Marley could have prevented his death by cancer by having his toe amputated

Marley died shortly afterwards during a stop-over in a Miami hospital whilst on his way back to Jamaica from Germany. It is thought that the brain tumour killed him but the lung and stomach cancer also played their parts.

The star refused to write a will because he believed that doing so would go against the Rastafari belief that life is “everlasting” and ferocious legal battles between Marley’s children ensued as a result of this.

To this day, Bob Marley remains the most widely known and revered performer of reggae music in the world and is considered a hero by many, especially those with a penchant for cannabis. The singer-songwriter is also hailed for helping the spread of Jamaican music and the Rastafari Movement, of which he remained a committed follower till his death. In 1994 Marley was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and in 2001 he was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

420 DUDE – Let's skin up!

Today is a very special day in the junkie calendar as across the globe the unwashed and unmotivated unite in order to ignite and celebrate 420 – an official holiday dedicated to dope heads.

All around the world, but in particular in the US, groups of pot heads are likely to spark up and toke to commemorate all the good that weed does around the world.

If they can motivate themselves to get out of bed that is.

Stoners all over the world skin up for 420

In past years, large groups of people have gathered together in order to smoke marijuana on 420, especially and surprisingly on college campuses and on Hippy Hill in San Fran.

Students? Hippies? Stoned?

According to Steven Hager of High Times magazine the term 420 was coined by a group of Californian teenagers in the early seventies. The pesky kids met in order to look for a marijuana crop they’d heard rumours of. Repeated excursions to locate the crop led them to meet daily at 4:20 pm.

Scooby Doo? Dooby Doo more like.

Since then, the term grew in popularity and became shortened to 420 – a term short enough that even stoners could remember it, until it became a common term within drug subculture.

‘I believe 420 is a ritualization of cannabis use that holds deep meaning for our subculture. It also points us in a direction for the responsible use of cannabis,’ mumbled Hager, possibly through a toxic fog. Apparently. Maybe.

[adsense]Pro drug campaigners have chosen the day as a time for protestation and to campaign for the decriminalization of the drug. And some people just get together to have a bit of a spliff and talk deep shit/plain rubbish, of no interest to anyone, not also in a stupor, and to repeat themselves because they can’t remember that they’ve already said what they just said – just.

That’s happened to me several times.

As a liberal minded individual, I like to think that we should all have the right to decide whether we want to smoke something that makes us stupid or more stupid or not. There are other, way more pernicious drugs infiltrating our malls and colleges, but the ‘happy and harmless’ drug is not as beneficial as some would have us believe. Many times it really is a catalyst that stimulates us to find the ever elusive and more powerful high, just as beer drinking can lead to marinating ourselves in a bath of hot vodka and doing octopus rolls down Madison Avenue, wearing nothing but sick.

That happened to me but only once.

Bob Marley kicks back and enjoys a spliff after writing a new song. Remember he's famous for music - mainly.

Some states in the US permit the use of marijuana – which has been used as an effective pain killer since agony first gained popularity and Neanderthal man’s digits became adept enough that he could piece rolling papers together and daintily lick the adhesive strip, without eating the entire assembly.

Expect to hear a lot of Bob Marley today and remember to keep a stash of dirty needles as ‘International Smack Day’ (the Martini drug of choice for abusers) is soon to follow.

Please share your thoughts on pot smoking and the rally for legalization by leaving a comment.

Read about some famous pot smokers like Rhys Ifans; Stephen Gately, Natalie Portman, George Michael and Mike Starr.

images: glitterngasoline.blogspot.com; sn3akrfr3akr.blogspot.com; vandalm.com

Cool Ruler Gregory Isaacs dies of lung cancer aged 59

Gregory Isaacs has died at his London home after losing his battle against lung cancer.   The 59-year-old Jamaican-born reggae singer known as the Cool Ruler or Lonely Lover because of his smooth, romantic singing style will best be remembered for hits such as Night Nurse.

Isaacs was heralded for his love songs and unlike previous reggae artists such as Bob Marley and Burning Spear he shied away from song content that glorified the Rastafarian culture.
His image was always sharp, dressed in Fedoras and sports jackets, he managed to combine a powerful prowess with a vulnerability that drew many to compare him to Tyrone Davis, an American rhythm and blues singer, and the late Marvin Gaye.

His songs revolved around a desire to find love or the wish to be understood by his fantasy lovers, a sentiment that was echoed perfectly by his baritone vocals.

Milo Miles, a music critic writing for the New York Times said Gregory Isaacs was, “the most exquisite vocalist in reggae,” and added that “his lustful songs are not simple seductions or sexual boasts but sensuous daydreams, escapes from tribulation that invite the listener along.”

Read about other celebrities who have battled cancer such as: Bill Hicks, Barbados PM David Thompson, Dizzy Gillespie, and Patrick Swayze.

Please share your thoughts by leaving a comment.

images: sonidoblundetto.blogspot.com, jahreggaeshop.com

Bob Marley: Could he have prevented his cancer death?

Reggae legend Robert Nesta “Bob” Marley died from cancer on May 11th 1981 aged 36. The illness stemmed from a toe injury acquired by the former Wailers singer during a football game in May 1977. Marley refused to have his toe amputated, due to his Rastafari belief that the body must remain “whole”, even after doctors found a form of malignant melanoma – a less common and very serious type of skin cancer – in his wound in July of that year. Despite his distrust of medical doctors, he let an orthopaedic surgeon perform a skin graft on his toe. However, the cancer continued to grow and eventually spread to his lungs, liver, stomach and brain. Marley collapsed while jogging in New York’s Central Park after playing two shows as part of his autumn 1980 Uprising Tour. The tour was cancelled, but Marley played one last concert at the Stanley Theatre in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on September 23rd 1980. The famous live version of his “Redemption Song” was recorded at this concert.

Bob MarleyTowards the end of his life, Marley sought the help of German physician Josef Issels, who offered an alternative treatment of cancer. “The Issels Treatment” is based on holistic principles and involves eliminating certain substances from the diet, having specialised vaccines and  vitamin supplements, and chelation and enzymatic therapies. The method is unapproved in the UK and deemed ineffective by the American Cancer Society. Marley died shortly afterwards, during a stop-over in a Miami hospital, whilst on his way back to Jamaica from Germany. It is said to be the brain tumour that eventually killed him, though it may also have been the lung or stomach cancer. The star refused to write a will, because he believed that doing so would go against the Rastafari belief that life is “everlasting”. Ferocious legal battles between Marley’s children ensued as a result of this.

To this day, Bob Marley remains the most widely known and reverred performer of reggae music in the world. The singer-songwriter is also hailed for helping the spread of Jamaican music and the Rastafari Movement, of which he remained a committed follower till his death. In 1994 Marley was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and in 2001 he was posthumously awarded the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

Other celebrities who died of cancer include Ingrid BergmanFarrah FawcettPatrick Swayze and George Harrison