Kirsten Dunst thinks people who don't get depressed are weird

I was going to write another interesting article about Beyonce’s latest amazing revelation – that pregnancy is a gift – but then thought that even the most persevering of CWD readers would become bored of the spoilt, small-minded woman’s inane babble. SO, for a change, we get Kirsten Dunst instead!

According to an interview published in Flare magazine, the 29-year-old think people who don’t suffer from periods of depression at some point in their lives are pretty strange.

Dunst, who has admitted to struggling with the disorder in the past, says, like many others, that it still a lot of stigma surrounding the issue.

Lars von Trier's own depression inspired the film Melancholia

“People are embarrassed to talk about it…I would never put anyone down [who] was in that kind of space.”

In fact, she reckons experiencing the depression at some point or another in one’s life is completely normal:

“I think most human beings go through some sort of depression in their life,” she says. “And if they don’t, I think that‘s weird.”

Thanks for the insight, Kirst. Actually, I don’t really have anything negative to say about Kirsten Dunst. It is possible that privately she, like Beyonce, is an irritating and boring little brat, but she’s been in some cool films. And I’d say to have been picked for a leading role by Lars von Trier is a good indication of one’s coolness.

Lars von Trier’s latest film, Melancholia is due out in the next month. The director himself describes it as “a beautiful film about the end of the world”. And if you watch the trailer, I think you’ll agree that it certainly looks pretty visually stunning.

Anyway, Kirsten Dunst plays the role of Justine alongside Charlotte Gainsbourg, her on-screen sister, Claire. Justine has just got married, but all the while the earth is being approached by a rogue planet, signaling the end of the world.

[adsense]The idea for the film originated during a therapy session Lars von Trier attended because he suffers from depression. The therapist told Trier that depressive people tend to act more calmly than others under heavy pressure, because they already expect bad things to happen. Trier then developed the story not primarily as a disaster film, and without any ambition to portray astrophysics realistically, but as a way to examine the human psyche during a disaster.

The movie premiered in May this year at the 64th Cannes Film Festival. Dunst received the festival’s Best Actress Award for her performance.

Click here to find out more about Melancholia.