George Clooney’s brush with malaria

George Clooney has been bringing the plight of refugees to the media and it was during his most recent visit to war-torn Sudan that he contracted malaria.

The Oscar-winning actor caught the potentially fatal tropical disease in the first week of January while he was visiting the North East African country to work on a project with the United Nations and Google to help stave off a new civil war.

The news of the 49 year old’s illness was announced by CNN talk show host Piers Morgan, who wrote on his Twitter page: “BREAKING NEWS: George Clooney has contracted malaria following recent trip to Sudan.”

Piers then humorously revealed that he’d received thousands of offers from women keen to nurse him back to health, tweeting: “Clooney malaria update: now have 24, 563 offers to nurse him. But his rep says his medication worked and he’s OK. Sorry ladies.”

Clooney’s rep has also confirmed that the Hollywood star is in the clear, saying: “This was his second bout with it. This illustrates how with proper medication, the most lethal condition in Africa, can be reduced to a bad ten days insteay of a death sentence.”

[adsense]Malaria is spread by mosquitos infected with malaria parasties. With just one mosquito bite the parasites are injected into the victim’s body and from the bloodstrea the disease makes it’s way to the liver. From there it will affect the red blood cells. This phase, where the parasite matures in the liver, is called the incubation period, and can last anywhere from 7 to 30 days before the first symptoms appear. Read more about malaria and the common symptoms of the illness here.

During the interview, which will air on Friday at 9 pm ET on Piers Morgan on Friday, Clooney joked: “I guess the mosquito in Juba looked at me and thought I was the bar.”

Read our coverage of World Malaria Day.

Images: Wikimedia Commons

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