Yoga can cure early stage heart disease, diabetes: Study

NEW DELHI: Can yoga be a cure for early stage diabetes and heart disease? The results of a year-long study, published in the latest issue of the Journal of Yoga and Physical Therapy suggests so.

In this study, conducted at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, 100 patients at risk for coronary heart disease and type-II diabetes were divided into two groups – one of them was prescribed conventional lifestyle modification such as exercise, diet and smoking cessation while the other was prescribed yogic exercises in addition.

“There was a significant reduction in body mass index (BMI), blood pressure and total cholesterol among others in both the groups. But when compared with the conventional lifestyle group, the yoga group had a significantly greater decrease in BMI, low density lipoprotein cholestrol (LDL) and increase in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL),” said D S C Manchanda, the lead author of the study, and head of the cardiology department at Sir Ganga Ram Hospital.

Manchanda said that mechanisms underlying regression of early arthrosclerosis – thickening of the artery wall – in metabolic syndrome was not clear though. “Control of several risk factors like hypertension, type-II diabetes mellitus lipids, reversal or preventive effects of both psychological and oxidative stress and reducing inflammation may be contributing factors,” he added.

On the basis of the study results, cardiologists say, yoga may be a cost effective technique to target multiple risk factors for heart disease and type-II diabetes prevention. “Though larger trials are required, it is suggested that yoga may be incorporated in the therapeutic lifestyle modifications for metabolic syndrome as well as coronary heart disease and type-II diabetes,” Dr Manchanda said.

Yogic exercises that have been shown to have positive impact include breathing exercises such as pranayamas and anulom-vilom – alternate nose breathing. Asanas like surya namaskar, tadasna and vajrasana have also been shown to have positive impact on patients.

Non-communicable diseases, chiefly cardiovascular diseases , diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases, are the major cause of adult mortality and morbidity worldwide. “Most of the non-communicable diseases, for example diabetes or heart disease, affect the person in the productive years. It causes reduced productivity and early retirement. Also, it puts immense pressure on the public health expenditure as in most cases the treatment costs are higher compared to the communicable diseases. Preventive strategies such as yoga must be propagated for better health,” said a senior doctor.

Low diversity of gut bacteria linked to heart disease, obesity


By Staff Writer
NYR Natural News

Natural Health News — New research shows that there is a link between number and diversity of bacterial species in the gut and the risk of chronic disease.

An international consortium of researchers report that overweight people with fewer bacterial species in their intestines are more likely to develop complications, such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. In addition, a gut with decreased bacterial richness appears to function entirely differently to the healthy variety with greater diversity.

Says lead researcher Jeroen Raes from the University of Brussels: “This is an amazing result with possibly enormous implications for the treatment and even prevention of the greatest public health issue of our time.”

Diversity is the key

Gut bacteria strengthens our immune system, produces vital vitamins and communicates with the nerve cells and hormone-producing cells within the intestinal system. The researchers add that gut bacteria also produces a variety of “bioactive substances” which enter the bloodstream, affecting our biology.

The gut needs a wide diversity of intestinal bacteria in order to maintain all these processes. In the current study people who were overweight were more likely to have low diversity in their gut flora.

The bacterial link

In this current study researchers took a closer look at the intestinal flora of 169 obese Danes and 123 non-obese Danes. The results were published in the journal Nature.

According to Raes “We were able to distinguish between two groups based on their intestinal flora: people with a large richness of bacterial species in their intestines and people with a fewer bacterial species. A species-rich bacterial flora appeared to function differently compared to the poorer variety. It was surprising to see that obese and non-obese people were found in both groups.”

The scientists found that the group with lower species richness in their intestinal flora was more susceptible to developing obesity-related conditions and chronic inflammation.

In addition, the obese people in this group were more at risk of cardiovascular conditions than the obese people in the other group. These are important results that suggest that it is not only weight gain and dietary habits that play a role in the development of medical complications in obese people.

Chicken and egg?

Metabolic conditions have become an epidemic partly due to the modern sedentary lifestyle and the and easy access to large amounts of energy-dense food. It is expected that obesity will increase tremendously all over the world; from 400 million obese people in 2005, to more than 700 million in 2015.

Some people appear to be more vulnerable to putting on eight than others and many studies over the years have examined the possible cause of this.

The researchers say they do not know whether lack of intestinal bacteria is the cause of obesity, or whether obesity causes a decrease in intestinal bacteria.

However, previous research has also suggested a link between gut bacteria and obesity. A study from the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, for example, found that certain types of bacteria in the gut cause it to take more calories from food, therefore leading to weight gain.

Dietary measures

Another finding of the international study was that a quarter of the participants had 40% fewer gut bacteria genes and correspondingly fewer bacteria than average.

Extrapolated to the entire population this suggests that a low number and diversity of gut bacteria could play a major role in health problems.

They say they cannot yet explain fully why some people have fewer intestinal bacteria compared with others, but they believe our diet may be a contributing factor.

They point to a 2012 study from a French research team, which revealed that a group of overweight participants who followed a low-fat diet for 6 weeks and who had fewer intestinal bacteria at the beginning of the diet, showed an increase in gut bacteria in both variety and amount.

“Our intestinal bacteria are actually to be considered an organ just like our heart and brain, and the presence of health-promoting bacteria must therefore be cared for in the best way possible. Over the next years, we will be gathering more knowledge of how best to do this.”

Good gut bacteria could protect obese people from heart disease and diabetes …

  • Scientists have discovered a link between obesity-related diseases and levels of bacteria found in the intestines
  • They also found that gut flora with low levels of bacterial diversity functions differently to those with a variety of microorganisms
  • Results
    suggest it is not only weight gain and dietary habits that play a role
    in the development of medical conditions in obese people

By
Emma Innes

13:18 EST, 28 August 2013


|

13:18 EST, 28 August 2013

Good bacteria in the gut protect obese people from heart attacks and strokes, according to scientists.

A study has found a link between the medical problems caused by being overweight, and the bacterial species in the intestines.

People with less of these bugs are more likely to develop metabolic disorders such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

Good bacteria in the gut protect obese people from heart attacks and strokes, according to scientists

Good bacteria in the gut protect obese people from heart attacks and strokes, according to scientists. People with more good bacteria are less likely to develop heart disease and diabetes

A flora with decreased bacterial richness seems to function entirely differently to the healthy variety with greater diversity.

Professor Jeroen Raes, of Vrije University in Belgium, said: ‘This is an amazing result with possibly enormous implications for the treatment and even prevention of the greatest public health issue of our time.

‘But we are not there yet. Now we need studies in which we can monitor people for a longer period.’

Metabolic conditions are becoming endemic because of people failing to exercise and eating foods that are high in sugar and fat.

It is expected obesity levels will nearly double from 400 million in 2005, to more than 700 million in 2015 – and the trend is expected to persist at least until 2030.

Professor Raes and his colleagues examined the intestinal flora of 169 obese and 123 non-obese Danes and found those with low species diversity had more metabolic abnormalities, such as increased body fat and insulin resistance.

A flora with decreased bacterial richness seems to function entirely differently to the healthy variety with greater diversity

A flora with decreased bacterial richness seems to function entirely differently to the healthy variety with greater diversity

Professor Raes said: ‘We were able to distinguish between two groups based on their intestinal flora: people with a large richness of bacterial species in their intestines, and people with less bacterial species.

‘A species-rich bacterial flora appeared to function differently compared to the poorer variety. It was surprising to see obese and non-obese people were found in both groups.’

The scientists found the group with lower species richness in the intestinal flora were more susceptible to developing obesity-related conditions and chronic inflammation.

The obese people in this group were more at risk of cardiovascular conditions than the obese people in the other group.

The results are important because they suggest it is not only weight gain and dietary habits that play a role in the development of medical complications in obese people.

In a second study published in the same journal, Professor Stanislav Ehrlich of the National Institute of Agronomic Research in Jouy-en-Josas, France, showed eating plenty of fruit and vegetables can boost gut microbes.

He looked at 49 obese or overweight individuals and found increasing consumption of high-fibre foods led to more bacterial richness and improved some clinical symptoms associated with obesity.

The finding supports previous research linking diet composition to the structure of gut microbe populations – and suggests a permanent change may be achieved through adopting an appropriate diet.

A QUARTER OF PEOPLE LACK HEALTHY LEVELS OF GUT BACTERIA

Humans have about 3.5lbs of bacteria living in their intestines, according to a new study.

However, a quarter of people have guts which house fewer bacteria than they should do to ensure we stay healthy.

One in four people are lacking the healthy bacteria which help break down our food and maintain a healthy digestive system, scientists have discovered.

Experts looking at intestinal bacteria from 292 people in Denmark found that about a quarter of people have up to 40 per cent less gut bacteria than average.

These people are more likely to be obese and suffer from mild inflammation in the digestive tract and in the entire body.

This is known to affect metabolism and increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Author of the study Oluf Pedersen, professor and scientific director at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, says we need plenty of bacteria in our guts in order to improve our health.

He compares the human gut and its bacteria with a tropical rainforest and explains that we need as much diversity as possible, and – as is the case with the natural tropical rainforests – decreasing diversity is a cause for concern.

In the study, which is published in the scientific journal Nature, Professor Pederson said: ‘It appears that the richer and more diverse the composition of our intestinal bacteria, the stronger our health.

‘The bacteria produce vital vitamins, mature and strengthen our immune system, and communicate with the many nerve cells and hormone-producing cells in the intestinal system.

‘And, not least, the bacteria produce a wealth of bioactive substances which penetrate into the bloodstream and affect our biology in countless ways.’

The comments below have not been moderated.

I’ve just finished a course of antibiotics and am having some natural yoghurt with breakfast each day to try to restore my good bacteria – still don’t feel so good – so I’m wondering whether to lash out the $30 or so for some refrigerated probiotics – I had once before and felt great soon after – hmm – maybe …

Frankly
,

Sydney, Australia,
29/8/2013 02:22

Kefir is one of the options. Lactofermentation is another one. people have been doing it for centuries. It is easy, it is cheap, you can do it. The only thing, you have to get over your fear of bacteria instilled in you by the advertising of antibacterial products.

Margareth
,

LV,
28/8/2013 22:54

In response to ‘Thomas. Hexham, UK’ there’s much research (finally!) into the importance of the human microbiome (our unique mix of gut/ intestinal bacteria) in relation to our health. The best ways – in my opinion – to increase the ‘good’ bacteria is to eat a balanced diet,* very* much limiting processed foods and sugars especially. Also, avoid broad spectrum antibiotics (which wipe out good bacteria and allow bad bacteria to flourish) unless absolutely necessary. Finally, find a really good broad probiotic – a good one will help to repopulate your gut with a diverse range of the ‘good’ bacteria.

Rachel_NZ
,

Auckland,
28/8/2013 22:48

Does a lack of the ‘right’ bacteria cause obesity, or does obesity cause a lack of the ‘right’ bacteria?

Norfolk Dumpling
,

Great Yarmouth,
28/8/2013 22:37

I’d be more interested in the different enzymes present and variations in their expression over time and on specific diets. There is great difficulty isolating all the bacteria present in the gut flora whereas the enzymes they produce can be easily measured. Also, it would be necessary to know which enzymes- even different types of the same enzyme so methods of identifying these would be required.

It seems odd if they haven’t used this approach which is called metabolomics/proteomics because it is agreed for many areas of microbial ecology to be the best. It will lead to more very interesting information about the role of gut flora particularly any links to cancers in the gut and diet and other gastoenteric diseases as well as modulation of the immune response.

ken mist
,

paris,
28/8/2013 22:37

I got my water Kefir off ebay for 3 quid, been using it for over a year now and never looked back, cleared up my acne too

Mark
,

Sheffield,
28/8/2013 22:27

The generational legacy of taking antibiotics for everything, including things they don’t help/cure.

MyOpinionIsDifferent
,

GrowUp, United Kingdom,
28/8/2013 22:18

Non of it will replace a good diet and exercise. It’s not rocket science and it takes effort.

worried for the future
,

Leeds England,
28/8/2013 22:08

As someone else said – kefir. Google it. I make my own.

Brighton Boy
,

Brighton sometimes,
28/8/2013 22:07

Good bacteria is really relating to taking a good probiotic supplement daily and eating lots of live yogurt .

petra
,

Sandon,
28/8/2013 22:05

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Diabetes lifetime costs – as expensive as a house?

Featured Article
Academic Journal
Main Category: Diabetes
Also Included In: Primary Care / General Practice
Article Date: 11 Aug 2013 – 1:00 PDT

email to a friend   printer friendly   opinions  

<!– rate article



Patient / Public:

Healthcare Prof:

A recent report published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine breaks down the costs of living with type 2 diabetes over the course of a lifetime. The dollar amount is eye-opening, and so are the differences in costs between men and women.

To calculate the costs of living with type 2 diabetes on an individual basis, researchers from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Research Triangle International created a simulation model that could compile the costs of both treating the condition and managing its complications. This is as opposed to only focusing on the overall economic burden of treating type 2 diabetes in a year.

The findings reveal that on average, a person with type 2 diabetes spends more than $85,000 over the course of their lifetime on treating the disease and managing complications.

Additionally, the point at which a person is diagnosed with the disease can affect how much they spend during their lifetime. For example, a man diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when he is between 25 and 44 will spend $124,700.

But women from the same age range will pay over $5,000 more, at $130,800 during their lifetime. Researchers note that costs go down the later in life a person is diagnosed with the condition.

The costs include not only those directly related to treating diabetes, but also to treating complications like kidney disease, nerve and eye damage, heart disease, amputations and stroke.

The amount of money spent each year on treating diabetes has significantly risen recently. Robert Ratner from the American Diabetes Association says that direct medical costs for treating diabetes totaled $176 billion in 2012.

“This is up 40% in 5 years,” he says.

On the more positive side, he notes that complications from diabetes have decreased due to better blood sugar level control. In fact, he points to a 50% decrease in amputations and a 35% decrease in dialysis or transplantation for kidney disease in the past 12 years.

However, Ratner says that the benefits of these positive outcomes are overshadowed by the number of new cases of the disease each year.

Ratner says:

“When you look at the annual costs, you can clearly see this is an untenable rate of growth.”

Quite a few studies have recently suggested ways to decrease the incidence of the disease. For example, some recommend that “catch-up” sleep could prevent type 2 diabetes, while other recommend taking short walks to lower risk of the disease.

Written by Marie Ellis

Copyright: Medical News Today

Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

  • Additional
  • References
  • Citations

Health Behavior News Service, part of the Center for Advancing Health

Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA


APA


Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


Add Your Opinion On This Article

‘Diabetes lifetime costs – as expensive as a house?’

Please note that we publish your name, but we do not publish your email address. It is only used to let
you know when your message is published. We do not use it for any other purpose. Please see our privacy policy for more information.

If you write about specific medications or operations, please do not name health care professionals by name.

All opinions are moderated before being included (to stop spam). We reserve the right to amend opinions where we deem necessary.

Contact Our News Editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact the editors please use our feedback form.

Please send any medical news or health news press releases to:

Note: Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a health care
professional. For more information, please read our terms and conditions.

Privacy Policy |
Terms and Conditions

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2013 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered trade mark of MediLexicon International Ltd.

back to top | home |
privacy policy

MediLexicon International Ltd
Bexhill-on-Sea, United Kingdom
MediLexicon International Ltd © 2004-2013 All rights reserved.
MNT (logo) is the registered trade mark of MediLexicon Int. Limited.

Too much soft drink may put youngsters at risk of diabetes , heart disease

Young people consuming more than one can of soft drink daily are more likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes, heart disease or a stroke, a new study has claimed.

The health of 1400 teenagers were followed by The Telethon Institute for Child Health Research in Perth, as part of its ongoing long-term Raine Study into children’s health.

The new results showed that drinking more than one can of fizzy, sugary drink resulted in lower levels of good cholesterol and higher levels of bad triglyceride in the blood – regardless of whether the people consuming it were overweight, the Age reported.

Researchers said that meant that these teenagers were at higher risk of cardio-metabolic disease later in life.

The Raine Study began in 1989 when 2,900 pregnant women were recruited, and their kid’s health has been assessed from birth.

The study has been published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Too much soft drink may put youngsters at risk of diabetes, heart disease

Young people consuming more than one can of soft drink daily are more likely to suffer from type 2 diabetes, heart disease or a stroke, a new study has claimed.

The health of 1400 teenagers were followed by The Telethon Institute for Child Health Research in Perth, as part of its ongoing long-term Raine Study into children’s health.

The new results showed that drinking more than one can of fizzy, sugary drink resulted in lower levels of good cholesterol and higher levels of bad triglyceride in the blood – regardless of whether the people consuming it were overweight, the Age reported.

Researchers said that meant that these teenagers were at higher risk of cardio-metabolic disease later in life.

The Raine Study began in 1989 when 2,900 pregnant women were recruited, and their kid’s health has been assessed from birth.

The study has been published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Croydon could ban new fast-food outlets due to obesity crisis | Metro …

The fries have it: The number of fast-food shops in Croydon  has almost doubled in five years
The fries have it: The number of fast-food shops in Croydon has almost doubled in five years

The opening of new fast-food outlets could be banned in a borough suffering an obesity crisis.

The move in Croydon, south London, follows a surge in the number of takeaways in the past five years.

A total of 246 chicken, chips and kebab shops traded in the borough last year, according to figures released under freedom of information rules.

The level has nearly doubled since 2008, figures show.

One in four adults in Croydon and a similar level of children are said to be morbidly obese. Nationally, some 1.3million children are obese, with more than one in four adults.

‘If people realised the damaging effect fast food and high-fat, deep-fried food can have on your health, they probably wouldn’t choose to eat it,’ said Croydon North MP Steve Reed.

‘There’s a particular issue with young people whose health can be damaged in the long term if they have an unhealthy diet. I’d like to see efforts made to reduce the number near schools.’

He added: ‘Croydon council has a duty to promote the wellbeing of the community. I’d like to see it pushing the law to see what it can do in terms of promoting a wider range of shops and healthier options for local people.’

Justine Sharpe, of Croydon Health Services NHS Trust, said children were suffering obesity-related problems that were usually confined to adults.

‘There are multiple health risks associated with eating fast food,’ she said.

‘The biggest are obesity and its related health conditions such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes.’

Croydon council confirmed: ‘We are considering using planning powers to control the number of fast-food shops.’

Hard times behind fall in heart disease and diabetes in 90s Cuba, says study

The hard times experienced by the people of Cuba in the early 1990s – when food was short and petrol almost unobtainable owing to the tightening of the US embargo and loss of Russian support – led to falling rates of heart disease and diabetes, say doctors.

Researchers studied the so-called “special period” between 1991 and 1995, when people resorted to donkeys to transport loads and the government imported 1.5m bicycles from China, to see whether eating less, walking, cycling and manual labour made a difference to the health of the population as a whole.

Unusually for a scientific study, the researchers, from eminent universities in the US as well as Spain and Cuba, put on record their condemnation of the political activity that caused the crisis and their admiration of the way the Cuban people coped. “We would like to acknowledge our great respect and admiration for the Cuban people who faced extremely difficult social and economic challenges during the special period – and by making common cause against this tragedy held up with courage and dignity. This tragedy was ‘man made’ by international politics and should never happen again to any population,” they write.

Cuba, which has a much-admired healthcare system based on the “barefoot doctors” who provide comprehensive primary care, has excellent data on the health of its people as well as complete and publicly accessible death records. The researchers, publishing their findings in the British Medical Journal, say they were able to track what happened to the weight of the population and look at the subsequent death rates from coronary heart disease, stroke and diabetes from 1980 to 2010, focusing on the city of Cienfuegos.

Led by Dr Manuel Franco, associate professor at the University of Alcalá in Madrid, the team found the population lost an average of 5.5kg (12lb) in weight during the five years of the economic crisis. That had a real impact on health, cutting deaths from diabetes by half and from coronary heart disease by a third.

“Marked and rapid reductions in mortality from diabetes and coronary heart disease were observed in Cuba after the profound economic crisis of the early 1990s,” the doctors write. “These trends were associated with the declining capacity of the Cuban economy to assure food and mass transportation in the aftermath of the dissolution of the former Soviet Union and the tightening of the US embargo. Severe shortages of food and gas resulted in a widespread decline in dietary energy intake and increase in energy expenditure [mainly through walking and cycling as alternatives to mechanised transportation.”

But as the economic crisis ended in 1996 and Cuba began to become more prosperous again, the weight started to go back on. From 2000, the economy has had sustained growth. From 1996, physical activity levels have declined, although only slightly. But energy intake – the amount of food and drink consumed – had increased above pre-crisis levels by 2002.

As a result, write the researchers, “by 2011, the Cuban population has regained enough weight to almost triple the obesity rates of 1995″.

Diabetes levels had dropped during the five hard years, but from 1995 they began to surge. With economic recovery, the incidence of the disease peaked in 2004 and again in 2009. From 2002 to 2010, death rates from diabetes were rising again every year at the same rate as before the crisis. Deaths from coronary heart disease and stroke were declining, as they have done elsewhere with better treatment, but only at the same rate as before 1991.

What this shows, say the authors, is that interventions to bring down the weight of whole populations – as opposed to leaving it up to individuals – can have real benefits. But, they say, “so far, no country or regional population has successfully reduced the distribution of body mass index or reduced the prevalence of obesity through public health campaigns or targeted treatment programmes”.

Franco, in a video explaining the study, says that one of the lessons from Cuba for governments is that “transportation policies are fundamental – therefore we should encourage walking and bicycling as means of transportation. The results also highlight the need for physical activity and diet changes to happen at the same time, involving the whole population.”

But he doubts whether the Cuban crisis holds out any hope for a beneficial health outcome from the current economic crisis afflicting European countries like his own. Europe is far more heterogeneous than Cuba, which has around 11 million people mostly of the same racial background and similar social circumstances.

In a commentary supporting the call for government action, Walter C Willett, professor and chair department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, says the study offers “powerful evidence that a reduction in overweight and obesity would have major population-wide benefits. To achieve this is perhaps the major public health and societal challenge of the century. Medical treatment of people at high risk for disease will have limited impact on mortality rates if the primary causes of disease are not dealt with, and reviews agree that solutions will require multi-sectoral approaches.”

Potential strategies include “educational efforts, redesign of built environments to promote physical activity, changes in food systems, restrictions on aggressive promotion of unhealthy drinks and foods to children, and economic strategies such as taxation.”

Drug May Ease Angina in Those With Type 2 Diabetes

Drug May Ease Angina in Those With Type 2 Diabetes

Ranexa shows effectiveness, especially in

By Robert Preidt

HealthDay Reporter

SUNDAY, March 10 (HealthDay News) — The drug Ranexa (ranolazine) may help reduce chest pain in people with type 2 diabetes, a new study finds.

The drug is approved in the United States for treatment of chronic angina (chest pain), but this is the first study to evaluate it in patients with diabetes, heart disease and angina, according to the researchers.

One expert not connected to the study said the findings are welcome news for patients.

The study “demonstrates that ranolazine is very effective in reducing angina in those with type 2 diabetes and, interestingly, is more effective in those with higher blood sugars,” said Dr. Howard Weintraub, clinical associate professor in the department of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City.

People with diabetes are at increased risk for heart disease, and people with heart disease and diabetes are more likely to have angina than those without diabetes, the researchers noted.

The study included more than 900 patients who received either 1,000 milligrams of Ranexa or an inactive placebo twice a day for eight weeks. The patients had type 2 diabetes, heart disease and at least one angina episode a week, and were already taking one or two other anti-angina drugs.

Between weeks two and eight of the study, patients taking Ranexa had an average of 3.8 angina episodes per week, compared with 4.3 episodes per week for those taking the placebo. Patients taking the drug used 1.7 doses of nitroglycerin per week, compared with 2.1 doses per week among those in the placebo group. Nitroglycerin is commonly used to treat or prevent episodes of chest pain in people who have coronary artery disease (narrowing of the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart).

The study was scheduled for presentation Sunday at the annual meeting of the American College of Cardiology in San Francisco. It was also published online the same day in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and will appear in the journal’s May 21 print issue.

The study was funded by Gilead Sciences, Inc., which makes Ranexa.

“Angina is associated with worse quality of life, increased risk of hospitalization and higher health care costs, and appears to be more prevalent in patients with diabetes,” study lead author Dr. Mikhail Kosiborod, associate professor of medicine at the University of Missouri, Kansas City, and a cardiologist at St. Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, said in a meeting news release.

“While ranolazine was shown to be effective in reducing angina in prior studies, this is the first time it has been prospectively evaluated in patients with diabetes — a high-risk and therapeutically challenging group,” he added.

Congestive Heart Failure – Symptoms and Treatment

Congestive heart failure (CHF), or heart failure, is caused by a number of factors which when combined make it difficult for the heart to pump blood through the body to vital organs. Causes of the condition include:

 

  • Previous heart attacks and resulting scar tissue
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Narrowing of the arteries which supply blood directly into the heart (coronary artery disease)
  • Heart valve disease
  • Congenital heart defects
  • Cardiomyopathy – disease of the main heart muscle
  • Endocarditis – infection of the heart valves
  • Myocarditis – infection of the heart muscle
  • Fatigue due to the heart’s inability to pump blood quickly enough

The disease causes a cumulative build up of blood inside the arteries as the flow from the heart is much slower than required, so blood flowing back in has nowhere to go resulting in congestion within tissue. An indication of CHF is swelling in the ankles and legs (it can occur in other areas of the body too) which is made worse by water retention when the kidneys are unable to perform properly due to lack of blood and oxygen.  This also leads to high sodium content as the kidneys are unable to flush toxins and unused minerals.

Fluid can also gather in the lungs which leads to breathing difficulties, and this aspect of the condition is generally worsened when the sufferer is lying down.

Diagnosing and treating congestive heart failure

The earliest signs as mentioned previously are breathing difficulties and/or swelling to the ankles and legs. A less obvious indication is weight gain caused by fluid retention. If you think you have any of these symptoms contact your doctor immediately to be safe.

The treatment of CHF is usually carried out by a series of programs which comprise of the following elements:

  • Extended rest periods
  • Healthy diet (lots of greens and fruit)
  • Moderate exercise (walking)
  • Specific drug prescriptions including:
  • Beta Blockers (a relaxant)
  • Diuretics (to eliminate water retention)
  • Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE)
  • Digitalis (Foxglove – derivative of a plant which increases the heart rate and regulates its rhythm)
  • Vasodilators (which widen arteries)

Specific causes of CHF can be treated directly without the need to use several different treatments and the doctor’s diagnosis should ensure the correct treatment is given. Specific cases include things like treating high blood pressure or surgery to replace a damaged valve.

In worst scenario cases the patient may need a heart transplant.

Please share your thoughts on Congestive Heart Failure by leaving a comment.

Read about sugar’s contribution to heart disorders; excessive dieting can lead to heart conditions; how dark chocolate can reduce heart risks; heart disease responsible for almost half a million US deaths per year; more younger patients with high blood pressure.

images: medicinembbs.blogspot.com; ratfanclub.org