FDA serves bitter pill to alternative diabetes treatment

Separately, in a case unrelated to diabetes crackdown, the Indian pharma major Wockhardt was also issued a notice for a range of violations, from manufacturing defects and poor training of personnel to inadequate toilet facilities.

“Until all corrections have been completed and FDA has confirmed corrections of the violations and your firm’s compliance, FDA may withhold approval of any new applications or supplements listing your firm as a drug product manufacturer,” the July 18 letter warned Wockhardt chairman Habil Khorakiwala, accusing the company of impeding FDA inspectors at its Aurangabad plant.

Wockhardt joins Ranbaxy, Sun Pharma, RPG Life Sciences among Indian drug companies that have come under FDA scrutiny for violations that range from poorly trained personnel, to dodgy record keeping, to stinky toilets.

But it was the diabetes medication crackdown that sent shock waves through the industry, because the market for alternative diabetes remedies has grown hugely in the past decade. Sales of diabetes medication has increased 60 per cent — from $14 billion to $22 billion — in the last four years alone, as the world, from developed countries such as U.S to developing nations like India, have gotten sucked into a sugar-starch overdose.

There are some 30 million diabetes patients in the U.S and upward of 60 million in India (out of a world total of 300 million diabetes victims), making the two countries a lucrative market for western Big Pharma. Increasingly, diabetes patients are looking for alternative remedies, but the FDA clearly disapproves that route.

“Diabetes is a serious chronic condition that should be properly managed using safe and effective FDA-approved treatments. Consumers who buy volatile products that claim to be treatments are not only putting themselves at risk but also may not be seeking necessary medical attention, which could affect their diabetes management,” FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg said in a statement.

Medications cited in the ban order included unapproved versions of metformin and Januvia, which is procured from India and sold online in the U.S., and Diexi, manufactured by Amrutam LifeCare of Surat. Amrutam was also cited for dodgy claims with regards to supplements such as Zoom (for erectile dysfunction), Arexi (for arthritis) Allexi (for allergy), Cholexi (for cholesterol control), and Obexi (for obesity).

The FDA letter said some of these drugs may pose serious health risks because patients with underlying medical issues may take it without knowing that it can cause serious harm or interact in dangerous ways with other drugs.

For example, the letter to Amrutam said, “By marketing your products ‘Diexi’ and ‘Zoom’ as ‘all-natural,’ ‘safe and effective’ treatments with ‘no chemically generated compounds,’ consumers are misled to believe your products do not bear unknown risks nor contain APIs found in approved prescription drugs. Accordingly, the failure to disclose the presence of metformin and sildenafil renders these products’ labeling false and misleading.”

FDA serves bitter pill to alternative diabetes treatment

WASHINGTON: The US Food and Drug administration has cracked down on what are widely considered alternative or natural treatment for diabetes, including ayurvedic and homeopathic remedies. Fifteen companies in the US, including some that procure alternative diabetes medications from India, have been served warning letters by the FDA, asking them to stop sale in the US of products claiming to treat, cure, and prevent diabetes.

Separately, in a case unrelated to diabetes crackdown, the Indian pharma major Wockhardt was also issued a notice for a range of violations, from manufacturing defects and poor training of personnel to inadequate toilet facilities.

“Until all corrections have been completed and FDA has confirmed corrections of the violations and your firm’s compliance, FDA may withhold approval of any new applications or supplements listing your firm as a drug product manufacturer,” the July 18 letter warned Wockhardt chairman Habil Khorakiwala, accusing the company of impeding FDA inspectors at its Aurangabad plant.

Wockhardt joins Ranbaxy, Sun Pharma, RPG Life Sciences among Indian drug companies that have come under FDA scrutiny for violations that range from poorly trained personnel, to dodgy record keeping, to stinky toilets.

But it was the diabetes medication crackdown that sent shock waves through the industry, because the market for alternative diabetes remedies has grown hugely in the past decade. Sales of diabetes medication has increased 60 per cent — from $14 billion to $22 billion — in the last four years alone, as the world, from developed countries such as U.S to developing nations like India, have gotten sucked into a sugar-starch overdose.

There are some 30 million diabetes patients in the U.S and upward of 60 million in India (out of a world total of 300 million diabetes victims), making the two countries a lucrative market for western Big Pharma. Increasingly, diabetes patients are looking for alternative remedies, but the FDA clearly disapproves that route.

“Diabetes is a serious chronic condition that should be properly managed using safe and effective FDA-approved treatments. Consumers who buy volatile products that claim to be treatments are not only putting themselves at risk but also may not be seeking necessary medical attention, which could affect their diabetes management,” FDA Commissioner Margaret A. Hamburg said in a statement.

Medications cited in the ban order included unapproved versions of metformin and Januvia, which is procured from India and sold online in the U.S., and Diexi, manufactured by Amrutam LifeCare of Surat. Amrutam was also cited for dodgy claims with regards to supplements such as Zoom (for erectile dysfunction), Arexi (for arthritis) Allexi (for allergy), Cholexi (for cholesterol control), and Obexi (for obesity).

The FDA letter said some of these drugs may pose serious health risks because patients with underlying medical issues may take it without knowing that it can cause serious harm or interact in dangerous ways with other drugs.

For example, the letter to Amrutam said, “By marketing your products ‘Diexi’ and ‘Zoom’ as ‘all-natural,’ ‘safe and effective’ treatments with ‘no chemically generated compounds,’ consumers are misled to believe your products do not bear unknown risks nor contain APIs found in approved prescription drugs. Accordingly, the failure to disclose the presence of metformin and sildenafil renders these products’ labeling false and misleading.”

US considers lifting safety limits on blockbuster diabetes pill

A former blockbuster diabetes pill which was subjected to major US safety restrictions in 2010 may not be as risky as once thought, according to the latest analysis of the much-debated GlaxoSmithKline drug Avandia.

The Food and Drug Administration is reviewing a new interpretation of the key study of Avandia’s heart attack risks, which suggests the drug is as safe as older diabetes drugs. At a highly unusual meeting this week, the FDA will ask a panel of experts to vote on a range of options for the drug, including lifting restrictions on its use.

The positive safety review from Duke University researchers is the latest twist in a years-long debate over Avandia, which has divided medical experts, cost Glaxo billions of dollars and possibly resulted in an unknown number of patient heart attacks.

First approved in 1999, Avandia became the top-selling diabetes pill in the world by 2006 with sales of $3.4 billion. But prescriptions plummeted the following year after an analysis of dozens of studies suggested Avandia could raise the risk of heart attack.

For three years the FDA struggled to answer a seemingly simple question: Does Avandia increase the risk of heart attacks? A definitive answer has never been reached, in part because patients with diabetes are already predisposed to heart problems. That makes it extremely difficult to tell which heart attacks are drug-related and which are simply a result of the underlying disease.

Finally in 2010 the FDA decided to restrict the drug’s use to all but the rarest of cases. Regulators in Europe banned the drug outright.

FDA critics have speculated that the real purpose of this week’s meeting is to vindicate FDA officials who kept Avandia on the market for so many years. They say regulators appear poised to roll back safety limits on the drug.

… contd.


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FDA reviewing heart risks of Glaxo diabetes pill

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration will hold a meeting in June to reassess the safety of GlaxoSmithKline‘s former blockbuster drug Avandia, which was severely restricted in 2010 due to concerns about its impact on the heart.

Regulators announced the highly unusual move in a government notice published on Friday. The FDA said it will ask a panel of outside experts to review a new analysis of the key study examining Avandia’s heart risks.

A spokeswoman for Glaxo said the drug company commissioned researchers at Duke University to reanalyze the study, called RECORD, which followed patients for five years and tracked rates of heart attack, stroke and death. The new analysis “did not show a statistically significant difference,” in heart safety between Avandia and older diabetes drugs, according to company spokeswoman Mary Anne Rhyne.

The reliability of the study’s results was a key topic of debate in the FDA’s previous review of Avandia.

Glaxo argued that the study showed Avandia was as safe as other diabetes drugs. But some FDA scientists said that the study was unreliable because it underreported heart attacks and other problems.

Ultimately, the agency decided to severely limit which patients could take the drug, concluding that the potential risks of heart attack and stroke outweighed the drug’s benefits.

Currently U.S. patients can only receive Avandia after signing a waiver from their doctor indicating that they understand the risks and have tried other drugs to treat their disease. London-based Glaxo voluntarily stopped marketing the drug in 2010.

Presumably, the FDA could loosen restrictions on the drug if new evidence suggests it is not as dangerous as previously thought.

First approved in 1999, Avandia became the top-selling diabetes pill in the world by 2006, with sales of $3.4 billion. Sales began plummeting the following year after medical researchers began questioning the drug’s safety. The drug was also banned in Europe.

Last year Glaxo plead guilty to failing to report safety problems with Avandia to government officials over a seven-year period. The guilty plea was part of a larger $3 billion settlement with the Department of Justice — the largest health care fraud settlement in U.S. history — for various criminal and civil violations involving 10 of the company’s drugs.

Shares of GlaxoSmithKline PLC fell 5 cents to close at $48.47 in trading Friday.

FDA approves Johnson & Johnson diabetes drug, canagliflozin


Sat Mar 30, 2013 1:17am IST

(Reuters) – FDA has approved a new diabetes drug from Johnson Johnson, making it the first in its class to be approved in the United States.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the drug, Invokana, after data showed it was effective in lowering blood sugar in patients with Type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease.

The FDA has asked for five postmarketing studies for the drug including a cardiovascular outcomes trial, an enhanced pharmacovigilance program, a bone safety study and two pediatric studies, the agency said in a statement on its website. (r.reuters.com/juj96t)

Invokana is expected to generate sales in 2016 of around $468 million, according to analysts’ estimates compiled by Thomson Reuters.

Known chemically as canagliflozin, Invokana is a member of a new class of diabetes treatments called sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors that lower blood sugar by blocking reabsorbtion of glucose and increasing its excretion in urine.

Earlier this year, an advisory committee to the FDA discussed the benefits and risks of canagliflozin with a focus on any potential increased risk of heart attack or stroke.

A clinical study of patients at especially high risk of cardiovascular disease showed that within the first 30 days, 13 patients taking canagliflozin suffered a major cardiovascular event compared with just one patient taking a placebo. After that, the imbalance was reversed. The drug also caused a slight increase in unhealthy LDL cholesterol.

In January, 2012, the FDA rejected a similar drug, dapagliflozin, made by Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and AstraZeneca Plc, citing concerns over a possible increased risk of cancer and liver injury. The drug was subsequently approved in Europe under the brand name Forxiga.

In January 2013, Britain’s National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE), which decides whether drugs should be paid for on the state health service, declined to recommend that Forxiga be reimbursed and asked the companies for more information.

Diabetes affects the body’s ability to metabolize glucose, which is needed for energy. Glucose circulates throughout the bloodstream, is filtered by the kidneys, and returned to body by glucose-specific transporters. By blocking the amount of glucose reabsorbed into the bloodstream, more is excreted in urine.

Left untreated, diabetes can cause nerve damage, kidney disease and blindness. It affects roughly 25.8 million people in the United States, according to the American Diabetes Association.

Despite FDA’s rejection of dapagliflozin, and a broad association in the class with genital infections, several companies are still developing SGLT2 inhibitors, including Astellas Pharma Inc, which recently filed for Japanese approval of its ipragliflozin, and Boehringer Ingelheim and Eli Lilly Company, which recently filed for U.S. approval of their drug, empagliflozin.

(Additional reporting by Sagarika Jaisinghani in Bangalore; Editing by David Gregorio)

FDA studies possible pre-cancerous link with diabetes drugs


Thu Mar 14, 2013 10:57pm IST

(Reuters) – The Food and Drug Administration is studying unconfirmed reports that a widely used class of diabetes drugs, which includes Merck Co’s Januvia, may cause inflammation of the pancreas and pre-cancerous changes to the pancreas.

The agency, in a notice on its website on Thursday, said this is the first time it has communicated potential pre-cancerous links to the medicines, known as incretin mimetics.

The drugs for type 2 diabetes also include Victoza from Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk and Onglyza from Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and AstraZeneca Plc.

Patients should continue taking their medicines as directed until speaking with healthcare professionals, the agency said. The FDA said it is investigating findings from academic researchers that highlighted the potential risk.

“These findings were based on examination of a small number of pancreatic tissue specimens taken from patients after they died from unspecified causes,” the agency said.

The FDA has asked the researchers to explain how they collected and studied the specimens and to provide tissue samples so the agency can further assess any possible risks.

In the meantime, the FDA said it has not reached any new conclusions about safety risks of the class of drugs.

The agency noted it has previously warned the public about acute pancreatitis, including fatal and nonfatal cases, seen with the medicines. Package insert labels for the class of drugs already warn about risk of the potentially dangerous inflammation.

“It’s too early to tell, but we’ll keep an eye on it,” Edward Jones analyst Judson Clark said, when asked about the significance of the potential safety issues in Thursday’s FDA advisory.

But Clark said he did not expect any immediate changes in prescribing habits for the drugs because the pancreatitis risk is already noted on the drug labels.

The class of medicines, which mimic a natural hormone called incretin, prompt the pancreas to release insulin when blood sugar is rising. They are approved to treat type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes which usually develops in adulthood and is closely linked to obesity.

Merck’s Januvia and its related drug, Janumet, had combined sales last year of almost $6 billion, making them by far the company’s biggest product franchise. Onglyza and a related drug called Kombiglyze had sales last year of $709 million.

Shares of Merck were down 1.1 percent at $44.08, while Bristol-Myers shares were down 0.8 percent at $38.18 on Thursday afternoon on the New York Stock Exchange. Shares of AstraZeneca were up 1 percent at $46.31, also on the NYSE. Novo Nordisk shares closed down 1 percent in Copenhagen.

(Reporting by Ransdell Pierson in New York; Editing by Sofina Mirza-Reid and Matthew Lewis)

Johnson & Johnson Could Tap The Huge Diabetes Market With New Drug …

English: logo Johnson and Johnson esky: logo ...Johnson Johnson has been battling with patent cliffs like many in the industry, but it still is in a better position than many of its peers. Its patent protection on Concerta and Levaquin expired in 2011, while Invega lost patent exclusivity in 2012. All of these patent expirations put nearly $1.5 billion of revenues at risk. However, March could bring some relief to the healthcare company as its blockbuster potential experimental drug, Canagliflozin, is expected to receive FDA approval by the end of the month. After this, the European Medicines Agency approval should not be far away.

The type 2 diabetes drug had earlier shown strong efficacy in reducing blood sugar in diabetics, even as some safety concerns were also raised. While the potential of the drug is much higher, currently we expect the drug to achieve over $1 billion in expected peak sales. Below we take a detailed look at the drug’s prospects.

See our complete analysis for Johnson Johnson

Market Opportunity

With obesity on the rise, diabetes is affecting more people everyday globally. In the U.S. alone, roughly 26 million people suffer from the condition. Owing to these factors, the global diabetes drug market has seen rapid growth rate in the last couple of years. The type 2 diabetes drug market, which constitutes a significant chunk of the total diabetes drug market, is expected to grow from $26 billion in 2011 to $50 billion in 2021, in developed markets including the U.S., Japan and Europe.

While the market is crowded with several major drugs available for the condition, the fact that the disease is often associated with several other disorders such as cardiovascular events, kidney impairment etc., it limits its target patient population. This presents an opportunity for new drug compositions like Canagliflozin. Canagliflozin is a member of a new class of diabetes drugs known as sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors that lower blood sugar by blocking the re-absorption of glucose by the kidney and increases the excretion of glucose in urine.

Canagliflozin: The Road Ahead

In phase III clinical trials, the drug exhibited very strong efficacy in lowering blood glucose levels in diabetics. The drug also led to meaningful decline in weight loss. However, the down side was that it came with an elevated risk of heart problems. Following the results, the company filed approval applications with the FDA and the European Medicines Agency.

Despite the history of the FDA rejecting Bristol-Myers’ and AstraZeneca’s similar experimental SLGT2 inhibitor called Dapagliflozin on safety concerns, we expect Canagliflozin to be approved. Canagliflozin exhibited significantly higher efficacy than Dapagliflozin, which should weigh the overall risk benefit profile in its favor. An advisory panel to the FDA also recommended in January that the drug be approved and the agency usually heeds these recommendation. 

What limits the revenue potential of the drug is its lower efficacy in patients with impaired kidney functions. This is a common condition in diabetics, and the FDA may not approve the drug for those patients as the risks may well outweigh the benefits. However, should the FDA grant approval for this condition, the drug could garner significantly more than $1 billion in peak revenues that we currently expect.

Significant competition from rivals could also hinder the growth potential of the drug. Merck, the clear market leader with its blockbuster drugs Januvia and Janumet, is also developing MK-3102, which has exhibited strong efficacy in clinical trials. Further, Merck already has trained sales representatives to sell its diabetes drugs while this would be JNJ’s first diabetes drug. However, with a sound marketing strategy coupled with the unique proposition of a single drug offering qualities like reducing blood glucose levels and weight, JNJ may not find it difficult to make in-roads in the competitive diabetes market.

We are revising our $75 price estimate for JNJ to reflect the annual earnings and recent developments.

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NHS lauds potential new nicotine based anti obesity drug

The British National Health Service [NHS] is currently lauding a breakthrough in counter obesity measures after a company developed a prototype drug which will allow smokers to kick the filthy habit without having to worry about gaining weight.

Just as well, because most smokers I’ve ever met are incapable of running the calories off; even the most meagre of movements is met with aneurysm-inducing coughing fits.

But there in lies one of nicotine’s greatest powers other than addictiveness – appetite suppression.

Nicotine is a great appetite suppressor.This guy wants to stay stick thin.

Smokers often love to gloat about their slimmer frames and the need to never eat thanks to their little white friends with ginger heads, while they slowly develop lung, pancreatic, throat and just about every other cancer going. But hey, at least they’re slim, right?

Looks like nicotine doesn't suppress everyone's appetite.

According to the NHS website the miracle anti-obesity drug is just a pipe-dream at the moment and there is no concrete research to indicate that an obesity miracle cure will come from nicotine. However, knowing how desperate the pharmaceutical industry is to keep us from our cash and how the food industry is to keep us from our health, it won’t be long before the FDA is approving another snake oil pill to give hope to, and encourage a growing population to do nothing but carry on eating badly and dodging exercise.

The NHS has high hopes for an anti-obesity drug extracted from nicotine.

For all the money spinning, public-deceiving tricks being pulled out of the bag at the moment, the only true cure for obesity is healthier eating and exercise. We live in a world of convenience food and entertainment devices which keep us from being good to ourselves. Sitting on the couch washing down pizza with sugary drinks is not the way to stay slim. Equally, while many jobs are office or factory based giving workers little opportunity to exercise, half an hour of yoga in the morning will do wonders, especially when followed by a simple and quick to make smoothie.

Healthy smoothie or pills that don't really help fight obesity? You decide.

The other approach which works is to take little steps towards your new lifestyle. Start the day with a smoothie everyday and leave it at that. A month later start going to yoga once a week. Walk to the local store instead of driving there.

Then start introducing better food during the day; eat more raw fruit and vegetables from organic sources so as to avoid contamination by treated fertilizers and pesticides.

Healthy living is guaranteed to combat obesity but Big Pharma snake oil is still unproven.

Most of all, view your weight loss as a long term investment in yourself. Don’t look for a quick fix because they NEVER work. Improving your life is a long game and it takes dedication, but the rewards are tremendous.

Please share your thoughts on quick fix drugs vs. healthier lifestyles by leaving a comment.

Read about healthy, alternative lifestyle such as Raw Veganism, Vegetarianism, Yoga, or try a little juice fast and a smoothie.

images: dailymail.co.uk, liberal-vision.org, labourlist.org, sodahead.com, wellsphere.com, visualwebsiteoptimizer.com

White bread linked heavily to obesity

At a time when 1 in 3 Americans are considered obese, the lid must be lifted on the cause of such a dangerous and ugly disease. The finger should be pointed squarely at white bread although it can also point to a whole myriad of other contributing culprits such as lack of exercise (caused by excessive TV, internet and gaming), the increase in processed foods, the contents of which are government subsidised making them cheap to produce and cheaper to sell, the pledge drive by the food industry to promote snacks as part of our required daily intake.

The history of white bread is a shady place. From its inception it was a dangerously unhealthy meal filler enjoyed by the well to do, but as its popularity grew and the working classes got a taste, bakers were faced with the need to reduce costs.

In times gone by bakers would use plaster of Paris to make bread white for the poor. Very healthy indeed.

One way of doing so was to mix plaster of Paris into the dough. This gave it the white colour and appearance of white bread, but customers were to all intents and purposes eating the walls of their houses.

Of course, such a disgusting rouse wouldn’t be allowed to happen today, would it?

Well, you might be forgiven for thinking so but when you list the ingredients in the average white loaf it reveals some sinister element – sugar, high levels of sodium, white flour and ‘E’ numbers galore (preservatives, flavour enhancers, stabilisers), yeast and yeast extract (read as ‘mono-sodium glutamate’) – all of which have been approved by your good friends at the FDA and WHO and have also been consistently linked with an increase in diabetes, obesity and cancer.

[adsense]White bread is considered a high glycaemic index food which means it releases sugar into the blood stream quickly. Unless that sugar is burned off immediately it clings to areas of the body making them produce fat.

Foods like pizza, especially the deep dish variety, are heavy in white flour and that makes them a guilty looking suspect in the obesity war.

Who feels like going for a run after a 12” pizza with all the trimmings?

The truth is that most people will consume something like that while playing video games, watching TV or ‘Facebooking‘ and wash it down with a milkshake, sugary soda or a beer without thinking twice. This is where the damage is done because if the body remains at rest while the sugar from that meal is offloaded quickly into the bloodstream then it will rapidly gain weight through inactivity.

Symptoms of excessive sugary foods and lack of exercise.

Another problem which is becoming more and more widespread is diabetes, and the fast release of sugar into the blood can lead to a tolerance of insulin which is a leading factor in type 2 diabetes.

The white collar community has seen an increase in obesity and diabetes cases with office workers snacking on fare from the nearby vending machine as well as take-out sandwiches which are sugar rich. Although many office clerks have gym subscriptions and avidly maintain a strict exercise regime, they are ultimately too late after work when the body has already assimilated sugar from their lunchtime meal; a bit like leaving the washing up for a few days and then expecting it to come clean without losing fingers to the scourer.

Unlike reality where offices are populated by a diverse range of people including overwheight individuals, this picture depicts nothing of the truth.

So what’s the solution?

For those addicted to bread there are whole grain options but you need to find organic loaves which contain no ‘E’ numbers or sugar. Try to avoid the ‘white stuff’ which equates to white flour, white rice, white potatoes, milk and refined sugar.

Studies carried out this year have proved that people consuming whole grain bread actually lost, on average, 1kg of body more than those on white bread.

White potatoes and white rice are particularly bad too because they contain high levels of starch which acts as a kind of ‘sugar glue’ in the body, helping it stick in areas where it shouldn’t. Brown rice and brown bread are much safer alternatives.

Starch. Bad news basically.

It is better to avoid all bread completely and instead get your carbohydrates from fruit and vegetables like carrots, sweet potatoes, apples and bananas, as well as healthy fats from avocados, nuts and seeds. Essentials like iron can be garnered from delicious mangos or healthy green spinach (both best eaten raw) and for vitamin B12 there is always the option to not wash your vegetables completely (soil is a great source of the tiny amount of B12 the body needs) or indulge in some seaweed such kelp, nori or dulce.

A vegan salad provides all the nutrients the body needs without causing obesity. Food for thought.

Your opinion is valuable to us, so please leave a comment with your thoughts on white bread and its contribution to obesity.

Read about the start of anti-obesity drives, grants made available to combat obesity, obesity linked with increase in fybromyalgia, how drug abuse and obesity top parents nightmare list and how heart disorders have been linked to obesity.

images: vendingmachinegroup.com, en.wikipedia.com, diabetespharmacist.com, mediachemistry.com, food.lizsteinberg.com, superstock.com

Gwen Olsen speaks out against Big Pharma

Gwen Olsen may not be a household name but once you’ve heard what she has to say it’s a name that’ll stick in your mind for a long time to come.

Olsen spent 15 years working in ‘Big Pharma’, for companies like Johnson & Johnson, Bristol-Meyers Squibb and Abbot Laboratories. During that time as a sales representative she worked hard to push her employers’ products into the public domain in order to reap massive profits, but as time wore she discovered an alarming truth which pricked her conscience into speaking openly about it.

What she discovered is that Big Pharma is not in business to heal the sick and provide cures for the ailing; it’s in business to profit from the sick and the only way to do that is by keeping people sick.

She learned the dark truth about the pharmaceutical industry after the suicide of her niece who was given a prescription of psychiatric drugs – drugs which she didn’t need to take.

Olsen soon learned that mixing the drugs can have a terrible reaction within the mind and body of the consumer but the drug companies are only interested in selling more and more products, keeping the public fed on the line that they need the drugs she was peddling all those years.

One of the most shocking discoveries she made was that most of the psychiatric drugs she was selling were barely more effective than placebos and to all intents and purposes the public were being sold candy.

But it was when that ‘candy’ was mixed with other drugs it became a real problem.

What Big Pharma really wants

The truth is very simple; if Big Pharma was really in business to cure people they’d actually put themselves out of business. As a collective the manufacturers of these unnecessary drugs make around six times more money every year than any other Fortune 500 industry, so it’s in their best interests to lie to the public and lean heavily on doctors to continue selling their products.

The third biggest killer in the US is adverse side-effects from prescription drugs, and only heart disease and cancer kill more people. The two biggest killers have only become prevalent since the growth in the food and drug industries which should tell you something about the contrary effects they have.

[adsense]Heart disease and cancer could be eradicated quite easily through natural diets, avoiding GM foods, steering clear of unnecessary medication and taking in some regular exercise, and of course by doing so you eliminate the need for taking potentially dangerous drugs. Next time you’re prescribed a pill by your doctor, ask them what’s in it, what it might do and if there isn’t a natural alternative you could take instead. It’s in your best interests not to accept everything you’re told.

The problem now is that the pharmaceutical companies sponsor universities and many health care lectures are carried out by people from the drug companies, so in effect the doctors of tomorrow are being brainwashed into believing their suppliers before they even get out into the world of medicine.

The FDA is supposed to act as a shield for human health but due to the magnitude of Big Pharma’s power, they are often forced to compromise ideals in favour of supporting the heavily profitable drug industry; with pressure also coming from congress to keep the tax dollars rolling in.

Gwen Olsen today

In 2000 Gwen abandoned her work in the pharmaceutical industry to take up a position within the natural foods industry; firstly with Nature’s Way as an Accounts Manager, then as a Regional Sales Manager with Gaia Herbs.

She now spends her time writing, speaking at seminars and working as a natural health consultant and you can learn more about her work at www.gwenolsen.com.

Please share your thoughts on the drug industry by leaving a comment.

Read about why raw food is so good for your health, how exercise is better for easing depression than drugs, and some of the ways drug companies want to keep you ill like putting statins and uranium in the water supply and perpetuating flu epidemics.

images: trendsupdates.com, greenbd.info