It can also increase likelihood of high blood pressure and high cholesterol

  • Napping for more than 30 minutes at a time can raise the risk of diabetes, according to a new study
  • It can also increase likelihood of high blood pressure and high cholesterol

By
Pat Hagan

19:04 EST, 20 September 2013


|

19:14 EST, 20 September 2013

They were much favoured by Margaret Thatcher, Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill.

But while afternoon naps may revitalise tired brains, they can also increase the risk of diabetes, according to new research.

A study of more than 27,000 people in China – where taking a post-lunch snooze is very popular – shows napping for more than 30 minutes at a time can raise the chances of developing type two diabetes.

Researchers found men and women taking 40 winks were also more likely to have high blood pressure and raised cholesterol levels compared to those who stayed awake through the day.

Napping for more than 30 minutes at a time can raise the chances of developing type two diabetes, according to a new study

Napping for more than 30 minutes at a time can raise the chances of developing type two diabetes, according to a new study

The findings, published in the journal Sleep Medicine, are in contrast to those from other recent studies, which found daytime sleeps could boost brain power and slash the risk of heart attacks and strokes by more than a third.

The researchers said it’s the duration of the nap that counts. Those dozing for half an hour or more were more likely to have the early signs of diabetes than those who snoozed for less time or not at all.

In 2009, a planned UK National Siesta Day was cancelled when similar research from China found a 26 per cent increase in diabetes risk among those regularly getting their heads down in the afternoon.

Diabetes affects an estimated 2.5 million people in the UK. Around ten per cent of cases are due to type one, which is thought to be caused by a malfunctioning immune system and has nothing to do with diet.

Diabetes affects an estimated 2.5 million people in the UK. Above, a woman tests her blood sugar (file pic)

Diabetes affects an estimated 2.5 million people in the UK, with around ten per cent of cases due to a malfunctioning immune system. Above, a woman tests her blood sugar (file pic)

But the remaining 90 per cent are type two, closely linked to unhealthy diet and lifestyle.

The body loses its ability to make use of glucose, a type of sugar that is released when we eat food and turned into a source of energy for use by muscles.

As glucose levels rise, circulation starts to suffer and blood vessels in areas such as the heart, the legs and the eyes can be irreparably damaged.

In the latest study, researchers at the Huazhong University of Science and Technology in China studied 27,009 men and women aged 45 or over.

Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was famously known for napping

Former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was famously known for napping

Almost 70 per cent of the volunteers said they regularly took a nap in the afternoon.

Researchers checked their health by carrying out a test called impaired fasting plasma glucose.

This measures whether sugar in the blood is too high and acts as an early warning sign that type two diabetes is setting in.

Researchers also looked to see which volunteers were in the early stages of the disease.

They found glucose readings were much higher among those who favoured a daytime sleep.

Forty per cent of them also had high blood pressure, compared to just 33 per cent of non-nappers, and 24 per cent had high cholesterol, versus 19 per cent.

One reason a siesta may be harmful is it simply means less exercise is being undertaken, the researchers said.

But it could also be that it disrupts the body’s internal clock and exposes organs to higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol.

In a report on their findings the researchers said: ‘Napping in the elderly can be beneficial for daytime functioning, as well as for mental health.

‘But there is accumulating evidence showing it may also be a risk factor for morbidity and mortality.’
Dr Matthew Hobbs, head of research for Diabetes UK, said there was no proof that napping actually caused diabetes.

He said: ‘The bottom line is that the best way to reduce your risk of type two diabetes is to maintain a healthy weight by eating a healthy, balanced diet and by being regularly physically active.’

The comments below have been moderated in advance.

My dad and grandfather took a nap every day. Neither one ever had health problems. This study sounds like it was staged.

Grace
,

tucson, United States,
21/9/2013 03:01

Where do you people get these study ideas? Is there anything you are not studying? If we believe all these studies we will find that everything we do is bad for us and everything we do not do is what is good for us. The egg is bad, no the egg is good, napping of all things being deadly is the last straw. How come sleeping at night doesn’t kill us too? Oh wait, we snore!

scottyusa
,

Windham, United States,
21/9/2013 03:00

What a load of cobblers if was good enough for Maggie,Albert and Winnie then it is good enough for me,i love my afternoon naps.I am retired and no i do not have diabetes,high blood pressure or high cholesterol but i do exercise a lot.

wolfy
,

warrington,
21/9/2013 02:59

Correlation does not equal causation. Likely,the people who take naps are less fit, less healthy and take naps because of these health issues.

Lisa
,

Melbourne,
21/9/2013 02:57

I think you’ll find you have ’cause’ and ‘effect ‘ the wrong way round here……

NHS Nightmare
,

Huddersfield, United Kingdom,
21/9/2013 02:49

nooooo….I like having a nap

texanscot2005
,

Htown,
21/9/2013 02:37

I guess that I am okay, as I have never taken a nap in my life. I can only sleep in a bed at night, however tired I might be.

rickyo
,

Charleston,
21/9/2013 02:35

Maybe they are already ill and need to nap because of this not the other way around.

Mrs Runner5k
,

Maryland,
21/9/2013 02:30

Or do people who have a nap are more likely to to have diabetes?

DanStlMo
,

ST Louis Missouri, United States,
21/9/2013 02:15

Does the nap cause the diseases, or do they nap because they already have early signs of the diseases?

PB
,

Atlanta,
21/9/2013 02:11

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

Obesity Risk Factors May Vary for Boys, Girls

MONDAY Aug. 12, 2013 — While some behaviors increase the risk of obesity for both boys and girls, new research shows there are gender differences.

For instance, although being on a sports team reduced the risk of obesity for middle school-aged boys, it did not for girls, said study author Dr. Elizabeth Jackson, an assistant professor of medicine at the University of Michigan School of Medicine.

On the other hand, “Girls who drank milk seemed to have more protection [against obesity],” she said.

Meanwhile, certain behaviors raised the risk of obesity for both boys and girls, the study found. Eating school lunch regularly increased the risk of obesity by 29 percent for boys and 27 percent for girls. Watching two or more hours of television a day boosted the odds of obesity by 19 percent for both genders.

The study, which found links but not cause and effect, is published online Aug. 12 and in the September print issue of Pediatrics.

Childhood obesity is a major public health concern. During the past 30 years, obesity has increased dramatically among children and teens. Among middle-school children, for instance, nearly 20 percent were obese, according to a 2010 report.

Earlier this month, a new report from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention held a glimmer of hope: Obesity rates among low-income preschoolers had dropped slightly in at least 19 states. However, there is still a long way to go, experts agreed.

In the new study, Jackson looked at data obtained from more than 1,700 sixth-grade students from 20 schools in Michigan between 2004 and 2011. The researchers had information on body mass index (a measure of body fat), blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar and other measures of health, along with habits such as TV viewing.

More than 37 percent of boys and about 31 percent of girls were overweight or obese.

The obese boys and girls had lower HDL (“good”) cholesterol, higher blood pressure and other indicators of heart disease risk than the normal or underweight students.

When Jackson looked at the habits, she found the “predictors” of obesity.

Sports-team activity reduced the risk of obesity in boys by 23 percent. Milk drinking reduced the risk of obesity in girls by 19 percent. Jackson said it’s possible that those who drank milk may be less likely to drink sugary beverages, which are linked with weight gain.

The link between TV viewing and weight issues is well known. The risk of obesity linked with eating school lunches regularly, she said, may be related to the fact that children who often eat school lunches (sometimes subsidized) may be from lower-income families, and lower socioeconomic status has been linked with a higher likelihood of obesity.

Jackson said sports may not have shown up as a risk-reduction behavior for girls because they may have underreported. For instance, they may not have considered dancing or cheerleading as sports activities.

“There are no big surprises really in the major findings, all have been previously reported,” said Michael Goran, a professor of preventive medicine and director of the Childhood Obesity Research Center at the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. He reviewed the findings.

Strategies to reduce the risk of obesity vary by age, Goran said. For middle-school children, he suggests that parents reduce the intake of sugary beverages, set limits on television and other media time, limit desserts and other treats. “Establish patterns as early as possible for healthy eating and active living,” he said.

“Shop, cook and eat together and include children in the decisions and planning around meals, treats and activity,” he said.

To that, study author Jackson added that schools and parents could also encourage girls to participate more in sports.

More information

To learn more about fighting childhood obesity, visit Let’s Move!

Posted: August 2013

View comments

Diabetes Control Has Gotten Much Better




diabetes, diabetes control, A1C, blood pressure


CREDIT: Dreamstime.


More than ever, Americans with diabetes are meeting three goals vital for control of their disease, a new study finds. And that could lower their risk for diabetes-related complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness and amputations.

According to the study results, the number of Americans with diabetes who now meet or exceed goals for the three “ABCs” ― which stand for A1C, blood pressure and cholesterol ―  increased from about 2 percent in 1988 to nearly 19 percent in 2010. A1C is a measure of blood glucose, or sugar, over two to three months.

Experts recommend that people with diabetes aim for an A1C of less than 7 percent; a blood pressure reading under 130/80 mmHg; and an LDL cholesterol reading of less than 100 mg/dL. (LDL is considered the “bad” cholesterol.)

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed data gathered by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1988 to 1994 and from 1999 to 2010. NHANES is a federal program of studies that regularly assesses the health and nutritional status of Americans.

The investigators found that 53 percent of Americans met A1C goals from 2007 to 2010, compared with 43 percent from 1988 to 1994. Fifty one percent of people with diabetes met blood pressure goals, up from 33 percent. And 56 percent met cholesterol goals, up from 10 percent.

The researchers attributed the improvement in LDL cholesterol to a dramatic increase in statin use. Some 51.4 percent of adults with diabetes take the cholesterol-lowering drugs, compared with 4.2 percent from 1988 to 1994, according to the study.

Several factors may be driving the improvement in diabetes control,  according to the researchers. Among them: new and improved medications; rising concerns about the obesity and diabetes epidemics in the U.S.; and more attention being placed on healthy behaviors.

Despite the heartening news, not everyone who has diabetes is doing a good job of controlling it. Nearly half of Americans with diabetes did not meet each ABC goal, the researchers wrote.

People 75 or older were more likely to have controlled their A1C than were adults ages 20 to 49. And non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanic blacks were more likely than Mexican Americans to have an A1C of less than 7 percent.

Blood pressure goals were more likely to be reached by younger people than by older people; by non-Hispanic whites than by non-Hispanic blacks; and by people who had graduated from college than by people who had graduated only from high school.

Finally, older people were more successful at lowering LDL cholesterol than younger people. So were non-Hispanic whites, people who had at least a high school diploma, and men.

“Our data also show that there is much room for improvement,” the researchers wrote. “As the U.S. population ages and diabetes prevalence increases, it becomes increasingly urgent to find ways to overcome barriers to good diabetes management and deliver affordable, quality care so those with diabetes can live a longer and healthier life without serious diabetes complications.”

Pass it on: More Americans are controlling their diabetes, but there’s room for improvement.

This story was provided by MyHealthNewsDaily, a sister site to LiveScience. Follow MyHealthNewsDaily on Twitter @MyHealth_MHND. We’re also on Facebook  Google+.

Diabetes Control Has Gotten Much Better

More than ever, Americans with diabetes are meeting three goals vital for control of their disease, a new study finds. And that could lower their risk for diabetes-related complications such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness and amputations.

According to the study results, the number of Americans with diabetes who now meet or exceed goals for the three “ABCs” ? which stand for A1C, blood pressure and cholesterol ?  increased from about 2 percent in 1988 to nearly 19 percent in 2010. A1C is a measure of blood glucose, or sugar, over two to three months.

Experts recommend that people with diabetes aim for an A1C of less than 7 percent; a blood pressure reading under 130/80 mmHg; and an LDL cholesterol reading of less than 100 mg/dL. (LDL is considered the “bad” cholesterol.)

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed data gathered by the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1988 to 1994 and from 1999 to 2010. NHANES is a federal program of studies that regularly assesses the health and nutritional status of Americans.

The investigators found that 53 percent of Americans met A1C goals from 2007 to 2010, compared with 43 percent from 1988 to 1994. Fifty one percent of people with diabetes met blood pressure goals, up from 33 percent. And 56 percent met cholesterol goals, up from 10 percent.

The researchers attributed the improvement in LDL cholesterol to a dramatic increase in statin use. Some 51.4 percent of adults with diabetes take the cholesterol-lowering drugs, compared with 4.2 percent from 1988 to 1994, according to the study.

Several factors may be driving the improvement in diabetes control,  according to the researchers. Among them: new and improved medications; rising concerns about the obesity and diabetes epidemics in the U.S.; and more attention being placed on healthy behaviors.

Despite the heartening news, not everyone who has diabetes is doing a good job of controlling it. Nearly half of Americans with diabetes did not meet each ABC goal, the researchers wrote.

People 75 or older were more likely to have controlled their A1C than were adults ages 20 to 49. And non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanic blacks were more likely than Mexican Americans to have an A1C of less than 7 percent.

Blood pressure goals were more likely to be reached by younger people than by older people; by non-Hispanic whites than by non-Hispanic blacks; and by people who had graduated from college than by people who had graduated only from high school.

Finally, older people were more successful at lowering LDL cholesterol than younger people. So were non-Hispanic whites, people who had at least a high school diploma, and men.

“Our data also show that there is much room for improvement,” the researchers wrote. “As the U.S. population ages and diabetes prevalence increases, it becomes increasingly urgent to find ways to overcome barriers to good diabetes management and deliver affordable, quality care so those with diabetes can live a longer and healthier life without serious diabetes complications.”

Pass it on: More Americans are controlling their diabetes, but there’s room for improvement.

Follow MyHealthNewsDaily on Twitter @MyHealth_MHND. We’re also on Facebook  Google+.

 

 

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Heart Disease: spread the message on National Wear Red Day

Wearing red in February isn’t just reserved for Valentine’s Day anymore. Today woman across the States are rummaging through their cupboards and slipping into their favorite red numbers, all in the name of a good cause: to raise awareness about heart disease.

Heart disease, which is brought on when arteries in the heart become clogged and oxygen and essential nutrients can no longer  travel freely to the heart, is the number one killer of women. One in four women will die of heart disease, compared to one in 30 who will die from breast cancer. In fact, according to Susan B. Shurin, M.D., director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), more women die of heart disease than from all types of cancer combined.

African Americans and Hispanics are more prone to heart disease and people with a high blood pressure, cholesterol, who are overweight and who smoke are also at an increased risk. The good news is that with the awareness that is being generated about how to be heart smart, people are increasingly taking the necessary steps to lower the risks by giving smoking the boot, eating a balanced diet, maintaining a healthy weight and physically active lifestyle.  Together, these lifestyle changes can lower a woman’s chance of heart disease by more than 82 percent.

National Wear Red Day was created in support of The Heart Truth, a national awareness campaign implemented to “give women a [adsense]personal and urgent wakeup call about their risk of heart disease.” In 2002 it launched its eye-catching logo of a red dress to remind people: ” “Heart Disease Doesn’t Care What You Wear — It’s the #1 Killer of Women.” According to the Women’s Heart Foundation, approximately 8.6 million women die from heart disease annually.

On Wednesday, February 9, 2011, the Red Dress will come to life in a flurry of glitz and glamor at Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week in New York City, with the debut of the Red Dress Collection 2011. Stunning fashion and celebrities galore, all in the name of encouraging women to be heart smart.  Thumbs up!

Click here to read about getting healthy with the vegetarian diet, the raw food diet and the vegan diet.

Images: blisstree.com and freakgossip.com

US Health authorities want statins added to drinking water

US Health authorities are currently pushing for ‘anti-cholesterol’ drugs to be added to the water supply. The drugs, known as ‘statins’ supposedly help reduce cholesterol and lower the risk of heart disease, but in-depth studies have shown that the drugs can actually have a detrimental effect on the health of people without cholesterol or heart disorders.

Adding statins to the water supply would be disastrous as known side-effects of the drugs include depression, mood swings, short term memory loss and liver dysfunction.

Statins are prescribed daily to millions upon millions of people, understandably so given the type of food the majority consumes. Unhealthy GM foods full of white flour and sugar, combined with a lack of exercise and couch potato culture are the real cause of artery clogging.

What are statins?

Statins: Soon we'll all be taking them.

Statins are produced by companies like Merck, and in 1975 their CEO, Henry Gadsden dreamed of the day he could sell a drug to people who had no discernible illness. Mike Adams put it more accurately when he said, “They needed a way to sell drugs to healthy people.”

Statins came along at around the same time as genetically modified food, and the big bucks started rolling in for Big Pharma and the food and chemical industries.

The manufacturers claim that statins have been proven to lower cholesterol and help prevent heart disease and strokes, and this has led to many health experts insisting they be added to public water supplies. That suggestion comes straight from the pages of Brave New World by Aldous Huxley in which the population were mass controlled and pacified by a drug called Soma.

Cochrane Library research

A study recently published in the Cochrane Library, which reviews drug trials, examined data from 14 different drugs trials that used 34,000 patients as subjects. The results showed disturbing evidence of “short-term memory loss, depression and mood swings,” which in the past had been deliberately underplayed by the drug companies funding the research.

The researchers warned that, “Statins should only be prescribed to those with heart disease, or who have suffered the condition in the past. Researchers warn that unless a patient is at high risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke, statins may cause more harm than good.”

However, despite the fact that statins have also been linked to a greater risk of liver dysfunction, acute kidney failure, cataracts, muscle damage, and in pregnant women – especially the first trimester – foetal abnormalities, spontaneous abortions and foetal death; health authorities are still insisting they be added to our water.

Aldous Huxley predicts the future

Just last week, the editor of MedPage Today, George Lundberg, MD, wrote an op-ed entitled Should We Put Statins in the Water Supply? And in May 2008, renowned cardiologist Professor Mahendra Varma called for statins to be artificially added to drinking water.

In 1962, Aldous Huxley said that humans would one day be made to “love their servitude” via the state-sponsored introduction of mind-altering drugs.

“There will be, in the next generation or so, a pharmacological method of making people love their servitude, and producing dictatorship without tears, so to speak, producing a kind of painless concentration camp for entire societies, so that people will in fact have their liberties taken away from them, but will rather enjoy it, because they will be distracted from any desire to rebel by propaganda or brainwashing, or brainwashing enhanced by pharmacological methods. And this seems to be the final revolution,” said Huxley.

Mass Medication

John P. Holdren, White House science magnate wrote in his 1977 book, Ecoscience, that sterility drugs should be added to the water supply as part of a program of “involuntary fertility control”.

The program of mass medication has already begun. 60 Years ago fluoride was added to the drinking supply, purportedly because of the health benefits it offered, especially to our teeth. Dentists still promote the use of fluoridated toothpaste which is equally harmful.

[adsense]Water purification is also not completely reliable, and many drugs such as Prozac have found their way into the water supply courtesy of urination. When it is passed through the body Prozac enters the sewers and is not completely destroyed by the processes used to clean water and return it to our taps.

The earliest recorded use of sodium fluoride in water was in Germany’s Nazi prison camps. The Nazis explained that the reason for mass-medicating water with sodium fluoride was to sterilize women and coerce the victims of their concentration camps into calm submission.

Please share your thoughts on the state of drinking water by leaving a comment.

Read about water fluoridation, hexavalent chromium in the water, feminizing uranium conspiracy, mass animal deaths, water pollution caused by fracking and dioxin pollution in Germany.

images: coretheatreensemble.com, topnews.in

Handful of nuts every day ensures a healthy heart

According to a recent research conducted by the team at the U.S. Loma Linda University, the consumption of nuts can reduce the cholesterol absorption in a human body. The experts are of the opinion that nuts constitute an important part of a regular diet, but maintain that sugar and salt coated nuts can be avoided.

In previous research studies it has been discovered that eating nuts is beneficial for a healthy heart but it is also important to set the accurate figure. In this study, nearly 600 people with average nut consumption of 67g per day, showed reduced levels of cholesterol by 7.4 percent. The subjects were put to observation for a period of three to eight weeks and it was found that handful of nuts a day can keep the heart healthy. According to news.bbc.co.uk, lead researcher at the US Loma Linda University, Joan Sabate was quoted as saying: “The effects of nut consumption were dose related, and different types of nuts had similar effects.”

www.dailymail.co.uk reports that various previous researches were studied to reach out to the finding and the nuts included in those studies are pecans, macadamia, almonds, walnuts, peanuts and hazelnuts. According to Ellen Mason, a nurse at the British Heart Foundation, salted nuts can be harmful for the human body and should be avoided in order to stay healthy. This research was funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research and Education Foundation.

Celebrities who have heart problems include Jennie GarthRobin WilliamsBill Clintonand Elizabeth Taylor.

Images: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/711729, http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1132705

Blood fat type other than cholesterol linked to heart disease

High levels of cholesterol have always been first to blame for heart disease, but new research suggests that there may be a plausiable link between another blood fat type and the condition.

Researchers at Cambridge University analysed 350,000 people from 101 studies and found that those who had increased levels of triglycerides in their blood were more likely to have heart disease.

But those working on the study, which was published in The Lancet journal, warned that more research was needed to  confirm the results.

“Such trials should help establish whether lowering triglyceride levels can reduce the risk of heart disease,” said lead researcher Dr Nadeem Sarwar.

Increased levels of triglyceride may cause heart disease

“We found that people with a genetically programmed tendency for higher triglyceride levels also had a greater risk of heart disease,” he added. “This suggests that triglyceride pathways may be involved in the development of heart disease.”

Triglycerides are a major source of human energy. They are produced by the liver or derived from foods, according to Yahoo News.

Speaking to the BBC about the results, Mike Knapton, of the British Heart Foundation, said: “It could yet prove to be an important step towards tackling cardiovascular disease but we mustn’t get ahead of ourselves.“

Images: Wikimedia Commons and SuperFantastic

Chokeberry helps regulate body weight, reduces cholesterol

A recent study has revealed that chokeberry works like an antioxidant and helps regulate weight. According to www.sciencedaily.com, chokeberry contains high level of certain anthocyanins which help in weight gain regulation as well as in maintaining blood glucose. The research study was conducted by a team of scientists as a part of American Society for Nutrition programme. The study was carried out on a number of rats who at first were fed a diet rich in fructose for a period of 6 weeks in order to turn them pre-diabetic. Thereafter, they were divided into two groups; while one group was made to consume pure water the other group was given water with certain proportions of extracts of chokeberry.

Black chokeberries

As per www.physorg.com, at the end of the study both groups were tested on several counts including body fat, body weight and glucose regulation among others. The findings revealed that the group which was given water with chokeberry extracts reported for decreased levels of blood glucose, as well as lesser cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and plasma triglycerides. The team of scientists said that the study “provides evidence that the chokeberry extract inhibits weight gain in insulin-resistant animals and that it modulates multiple genes associated with adipose tissue growth, blood glucose regulation, and inflammatory pathways.”

Celebrities who have battled weight problems include Oprah WinfreyKirstie AlleySara Rue and Sharon Osbourne.

Images: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Choke-Berries-IMG_2431_051013_121714.jpg, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aronia_berries.JPG

High sugar consumption may increase risk of heart ailments

A recent study has revealed that consumption of increased levels of sugar may lead to rise in the risk of development of heart diseases. According to www.foodconsumer.org, the study has held added sugar responsible for increased chances of several health related problems including that of Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, heart ailments and cancer.  The study was conducted by the researchers at the Emory School of Medicine.
As reported by www.msnbc.msn.com, the study incorporated the data nutrition and levels of blood lipids of 6000 adults during 1999 to 2006, compiled by the government of US. People were divided in the groups, while the highest sugar consuming group reported to have an intake of 46 teaspoons of add on sugar every day, the lowest sugar consuming group had a daily intake of 3 teaspoons of additional sugar.

The findings have also revealed that consistent intake of high sugar content may also lead to increased proportions of triglycerides as well as higher levels of blood lipids and may result in increase in cholesterol. “It would be important for long-term health for people to start looking at how much added sugar they’re getting and finding ways to reduce that,” said Miriam Vos, Assistant Professor of Paediatrics, Emory School of Medicine.

Celebrities who have suffered from cholesterol include Bill Clinton.

Famous people who battled Alzheimer’s disease include Ronald Reagan and Charlton Heston.

Images: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1023029, http://www.sxc.hu/photo/471488